STRATEGIC SCHOOL STAFFING: WHAT PERSONELL INVESTMENTS DO TEACHERS FAVOR?

Last registered on December 30, 2020

Pre-Trial

Trial Information

General Information

Title
STRATEGIC SCHOOL STAFFING: WHAT PERSONELL INVESTMENTS DO TEACHERS FAVOR?
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0006600
Initial registration date
October 28, 2020

Initial registration date is when the trial was registered.

It corresponds to when the registration was submitted to the Registry to be reviewed for publication.

First published
October 29, 2020, 7:20 AM EDT

First published corresponds to when the trial was first made public on the Registry after being reviewed.

Last updated
December 30, 2020, 2:13 PM EST

Last updated is the most recent time when changes to the trial's registration were published.

Locations

Region

Primary Investigator

Affiliation
Harvard

Other Primary Investigator(s)

PI Affiliation
UC-Berkeley

Additional Trial Information

Status
In development
Start date
2020-11-01
End date
2021-02-28
Secondary IDs
Abstract
A critical responsibility of school and district leaders is to attract, develop, and retain teachers. Efforts to succeed in these core tasks have proven notoriously challenging for many school districts across the United States. One factor that adds to this challenge is that policymakers must make decisions on how to manage the teacher workforce with insufficient information on teachers’ preferences. In this study, we collect information on teachers' preferences over compensation, benefits, and other non-pecuniary rewards. To identify the personnel investments teachers favor, we conduct a discrete choice survey experiment where we ask teachers to consider five sets of two hypothetical school profiles and then indicate which school they prefer. We describe each school profile using seven attributes, each of which represents a distinct personnel investment.

Better understanding how teachers value plausible alternative personnel investments is particularly important for at least two reasons. First, personnel costs are the single largest line item on a school budget, accounting for 80% of expenditures in the average public school (NCES, 2020). Second, personnel decisions determine teachers’ salaries and benefits, their class size, and their access to helpful colleagues (e.g. nurses, counselors, instructional coaches)- each of which may play an important role in shaping teachers' employment decisions.
External Link(s)

Registration Citation

Citation
Lovison, Virginia and Cecilia Mo. 2020. "STRATEGIC SCHOOL STAFFING: WHAT PERSONELL INVESTMENTS DO TEACHERS FAVOR?." AEA RCT Registry. December 30. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.6600
Experimental Details

Interventions

Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2020-11-01
Intervention End Date
2021-02-28

Primary Outcomes

Primary Outcomes (end points)
The probability a teacher prefers a school profile
Primary Outcomes (explanation)

Secondary Outcomes

Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)

Experimental Design

Experimental Design
Discrete choice experiment: We present teachers with two fictional school profiles and ask teachers which school they prefer. We describe each school profile using the following seven attributes: salary, class size, childcare benefits, and the presence or absence of support staff, including school nurses, school counselors, special education specialists, and instructional coaches. The specific value of each attribute is populated at random. The random variation in attribute levels allows us to estimate the average change in the probability a teacher chooses a school profile when it includes the attribute “treatment” value rather than the attribute “reference” value, holding constant all other attributes
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
Randomization done by computer
Randomization Unit
Attribute level
Was the treatment clustered?
No

Experiment Characteristics

Sample size: planned number of clusters
N/A
Sample size: planned number of observations
1,000 US K-12 public teachers will complete the choice task 5 times for a total of 5,000 observations
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
N/A
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
The minimum detectable effect size for this study is .02. This number reflects the change in the probability a teacher prefers a given school due to the inclusion of a specific attribute.
IRB

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs)

IRB Name
Harvard
IRB Approval Date
2002-05-19
IRB Approval Number
IRB20-0756 (EXEMPT)
Analysis Plan

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Post-Trial

Post Trial Information

Study Withdrawal

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Intervention

Is the intervention completed?
No
Data Collection Complete
Data Publication

Data Publication

Is public data available?
No

Program Files

Program Files
Reports, Papers & Other Materials

Relevant Paper(s)

Reports & Other Materials