The effect of gendered occupational titles on perceptions of peers’ and potential clients

Last registered on October 05, 2022

Pre-Trial

Trial Information

General Information

Title
The effect of gendered occupational titles on perceptions of peers’ and potential clients
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0010169
Initial registration date
October 04, 2022

Initial registration date is when the trial was registered.

It corresponds to when the registration was submitted to the Registry to be reviewed for publication.

First published
October 05, 2022, 11:29 AM EDT

First published corresponds to when the trial was first made public on the Registry after being reviewed.

Locations

There is information in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access.

Request Information

Primary Investigator

Affiliation
Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies, Trento

Other Primary Investigator(s)

PI Affiliation
Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies, Trento
PI Affiliation
Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies, Trento
PI Affiliation
Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies, Trento

Additional Trial Information

Status
In development
Start date
2022-10-05
End date
2022-12-31
Secondary IDs
Prior work
This trial does not extend or rely on any prior RCTs.
Abstract
Growing attention has been given to the association between gendered language and labour market outcomes for women, as across countries a clear negative correlation emerges between those languages that allow for a gender declination and women’s average status in the labour market (Jakiela and Ozier, 2019). However, the extent to which gendered language impacts negatively the labour market outcomes of women is still uncertain. Research effort, mainly in the field of social psychology, has been devoted to understanding the potential detrimental effects of using feminine job titles on the evaluation of female professionals. It has been shown, for example, that female professionals with a feminine job titles receive less favourable evaluations than both male professionals and female professional with a masculine job title (Formanowicz and Sczesny, 2016) and are perceived by men as less warm and less competent, with the consequence of having a lower chance of being employed (Budziszewska et al., 2014). We study this phenomenon in the case of Italy, a country with comparatively low female labour market outcomes, and Italian, a language that requires a gender declination, in a setting of high-skilled professionals working in a relatively wealthy region. In our sample, a significant portion of female professionals in different occupations employ the male declination in their professional life, as this is seen as a way to avoid gender stereotypes and gender discrimination. To test whether this mechanism is at play, we run a vignette study on a sample of high-skilled workers where different (female) professional figures for a specific profession are randomly presented in different scenarios, either as potential colleagues or service-providers, with the female or male gender-declination of the professional title. We measure whether the same individual, with the same observable characteristics, is ranked lower from potential colleagues or clients when presented with the female declination of the professional title.
External Link(s)

Registration Citation

Citation
Burlacu, Sergiu et al. 2022. "The effect of gendered occupational titles on perceptions of peers’ and potential clients." AEA RCT Registry. October 05. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.10169-1.0
Sponsors & Partners

There is information in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access.

Request Information
Experimental Details

Interventions

Intervention(s)
We run a vignette study on a sample of high-skilled workers where different (female) professional figures for a specific profession are randomly presented in different scenarios, either as potential colleagues or service-providers, with the female or male gender-declination of the professional title. We measure whether the same individual, with the same observable characteristics, is ranked lower from potential colleagues or clients when presented with the female declination of the professional title.

The sample of the respondents is obtained through the local professional associations of the region.

Intervention Start Date
2022-10-05
Intervention End Date
2022-11-18

Primary Outcomes

Primary Outcomes (end points)
- Differences in the rating given to scenarios 4.A and 4.B to female candidates presented with the title avvocata relative to the similar candidates presented with the title avvocato. We expect a potentially negative effect on the score when women are presented with the title avvocata. The outcome will also be compared to the differences in ratings between treatment arms in the same scenarios given to male candidates.

- Differences in the rating given to scenario 3 to female candidates presented with the title avvocata relative to the similar candidates presented with the title avvocato. We expect a zero or potentially positive effect on the score when women are presented with the title avvocata. As above, we will compare the outcome to the same outcome for male candidates.

We will explore heterogeneous effects by the gender of the respondent.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)

Secondary Outcomes

Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)

Experimental Design

Experimental Design
We randomly vary, directly on the survey platform, whether a female professional is presented with a female-declined job title or whether with a male-declined job title (in those professions whether the male declination for women exists and is in use).

The sample of the respondents is obtained through the local professional associations of the region.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomization is performed directly on the survey platform (Otree) .
Randomization Unit
The randomization unit is the individual respondent.
Was the treatment clustered?
No

Experiment Characteristics

Sample size: planned number of clusters
no clusters

Sample size: planned number of observations
We expect around 400 respondents. This estimate is based on the number of respondents who answered a survey on the same topic and target population in the previous year.
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
Respondents will be distributed equally between treatment and control, roughly 200 and 200.
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
the minimum detectable effect with a sample of 400 respondents is around 0.28 standard deviation for the standardized variable of the main outcome. The non-standardized variable ranges from 1 to 10, standard deviation is a priori unknown.
IRB

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs)

IRB Name
IRB Approval Date
IRB Approval Number