AEA RCT Registry currently lists 1312 studies with locations in 106 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Utilizing Community Health Workers to Increase Use of ORS and Zinc to Treat Child Diarrhea in Uganda
    Last registered on July 20, 2017

    Oral rehydration salts (ORS) and zinc are highly effective at preventing child mortality from diarrhea yet they are widely underused throughout sub-Saharan Africa. This research aims to test the impact of a novel preemptive home-delivery intervention aimed at increasing the use of ORS and zinc for child diarrhea in Uganda. The intervention aims to increase availability of ORS and zinc and reduce barriers to access by having BRAC's community health promoters (CHPs) deliver the products directly to households for free prior to a diarrhea episode. Under this set-up, the products will be readily available for free immediately after a child comes down with diarrhea. Moreover, we will disentangle the mechanisms through which the intervention could change product use by using a multi-armed app...

  • Attributing intentions under projection bias
    Last registered on July 20, 2017

    We experimentally test whether holders of different internalized norms interpret intentions of others actions in systematically different ways due to projection bias; the systematic tendency to overestimate the commonness of ones own preferences among in-group members. Since one typically cannot observe people's internalized norms, the strength of their social preferences or their monetary incentives, inferring intentions from actions is a multidimensional inference problem. This study seeks to study this problem by investigating intention attribution in a setting where the monetary incentives are known: a redistribution choice of voting for either full redistribution or no redistribution. Individuals with above median income will have monetary incentives for no redistribution and indiv...

  • Demand-driven, private sector enforcement of labor law in Bangladesh
    Last registered on July 20, 2017

    Weak states with poor institutions often do not have the capacity to implement and/or to enforce labor regulations aimed at improving working conditions. Increasingly, private actors have started enforcing labor standards in these countries, but the effects of their interventions on local firms and workers is currently unknown. This paper partners with a set of multinational retail and apparel firms to enforce local labor laws on their suppliers in Bangladesh. Specifically, I design and implement a randomized controlled trial with Bangladeshi garment factories, randomly enforcing a local labor law on supplier establishments. I aim to measure the impacts of this intervention on factories’ compliance levels and productivity as well as on workers’ welfare. I have also designed the interven...

  • Apologizing on Demand : A Field Experiment on the effects of apology on future demand
    Last registered on July 19, 2017

    Apologies are a key customer service tool for managing customer relationships. We run a field experiment with a retail technology company where customers who have a bad experience are offered an email apology and monetary compensation. We vary the wording of the apology and the size of compensation in order to test predictions of the apology model from Ho (2012). In particular, we are looking for the impact of an apology on the shape of future demand. Specifically, we want to know how apologies affect customer response to future price increases and decreases and to future bad experiences.

  • Research as Leisure: Experimental Evidence on Voluntary Contributions to Science
    Last registered on July 19, 2017

    Understanding why people have a desire to participate in science has critical implications for policy in public and private organizations, and for economic development and productivity more generally. Despite the importance of how and why people contribute to science, we know very little about these questions beyond the importance of career concerns for professional scientists. With the rise of crowd-sourcing and voluntary digital content provision, the potential for voluntary scientific contributions to advance scientific discovery could be large. Importantly, career concerns are unlikely to be important motivators for these volunteers. In this paper, we investigate why people voluntarily contribute to science and whether this desire can be increased through certain non-monetary incent...

  • Dissemination of new agricultural technologies in Africa: making extension work
    Last registered on July 19, 2017

    The project analyzes the role of information dissemination regarding new technologies and more efficient agricultural practices, and the potential bottlenecks extension services might face in their role of bridging the distance between the research institutions and the local farmers. We consider an ICRAF program targeting dairy producers in Uganda. The farmer trainer (FT) program focuses on dissemination of a set of practices to improve animal feeds and use them more efficiently. EADD trains volunteer farmer trainers, who in turn train other farmers in the production and use of the high-value animal feeds and feeding practices. This study is aimed at estimating the overall impact of EADD farmer Trainer approach, as well as analyzing the impact of different variations of the Farmer to ...

  • Impact Evaluation of a Large Scale Female Entrepreneurship Program in Mexico
    Last registered on July 18, 2017

    : The purpose of this project is to evaluate an innovative pilot program to improve the performance of female micro entrepreneurs in Mexico. This program is funded by the National Institute of the Entrepreneur (INADEM). The intervention is Mujeres Moviendo México, a program explicitly conceived as a large-scale pilot in five states, as the step before turning it into a national program, and it is implemented by Crea Comunidades de Emprendedores Sociales A.C. (CREA), a Mexican non-for-profit organization focused on providing business training and specialized services to female entrepreneurs in marginalized communities. Programs targeting micro businesses have become increasingly common in developing countries, particularly because micro enterprises employ a substantial fraction of ind...

  • Making People Pay their Debts: The role of salience, information, and computational costs in a tax amnesty
    Last registered on July 18, 2017

    This document describes the pre-analysis plan of a set of interventions that will take place in the city of Santa Fe, Argentina. In these interventions we will evaluate the role that messages play on the probability that taxpayers will cancel their debt with the Tax Administration by subscribing to a payment plan in the context of a tax amnesty. The interventions are the following. First, a group of recent debtors -debt less than five years old- will be divided into 3 groups. The control group will receive the old notification. Treatment one will receive a new notification that is more colorful and presents easy to follow descriptions of the payment plans. Treatment 2 will receive the new notification but including the computation of interests saved under each one of the payment plans a...

  • Can financial products reduce poverty and vulnerability? Experimental evidence from Benin on the impact of access to saving accounts and microcredit.
    Last registered on July 18, 2017

    Amongst many development actors and public aid donors it is commonly perceived that the poor cannot escape poverty because they are credit constrained and as such cannot invest. The main reason why they are credit constrained being the lack of collaterals. Microcredit, the practice of lending small amounts of money to the poor, is heralded as a key tool in the fight against poverty in least developed countries (LDCs). It is easy to overlook the fact that what the poor may actually desire is not a loan, but simply the ability to put their savings in a secure and reliable account. In which case the poor’s interest could be best served by providing access to an affordable formal saving account (microsavings). Addressing this empirically weak spot, this project will analyse the financial ne...

  • Does socio-emotional skills signaling matter in the labor market? A gender and skills correspondence study
    Last registered on July 18, 2017

    The study aims at capturing how employers value job seeker's signaling of socio-emotional skills and the effectiveness of these signals for male and female candidates. This is done using a a field experiment (correspondence or audit study), consisting of applying to real vacancy postings in 2 large cities in Turkey in five sectors on a large online jobs platform with fictitious resumes of comparable female and male candidates. We randomly assign the signaling of socio-emotional skills to candidates. The study attempts to answer the following questions: (a) Do employers discriminate job applicants based on gender? (b) Do employers respond to a signal of socio-emotional skills on a resume , and (c) Does the effectiveness of the signal of socio-emotional skills in terms of the call-back ra...

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