AEA RCT Registry currently lists 564 studies with locations in 87 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • How to Promote Order and Property Rights under Weak Rule of Law? An Experiment in Changing Dispute Resolution Behavior through Community Education
    Last registered on February 09, 2016

    Dispute resolution institutions facilitate agreements and preserve the peace whenever property rights are imperfect. In weak states, strengthening formal institutions can take decades, and so state and aid interventions also try to shape informal practices and norms governing disputes. Their goal is to improve bargaining and commitment, thus limiting disputes and violence. Mass education campaigns that promote alternative dispute resolution (ADR) are common examples of these interventions. We studied the short-term impacts of one such campaign in Liberia, where property disputes are endemic. Residents of 86 of 246 towns randomly received training in ADR practices and norms; this training reached 15% of adults. One year later, treated towns had higher resolution of land disputes and lowe...

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  • Generating Skilled Self-Employment in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Uganda
    Last registered on February 09, 2016

    We study a government program in Uganda designed to help the poor and unemployed become self-employed artisans, increase incomes, and thus promote social stability. Young adults in Uganda’s conflict-affected north were invited to form groups and submit grant proposals for vocational training and business start-up. Funding was randomly assigned among screened and eligible groups. Treatment groups received unsupervised grants of $382 per member. Grant recipients invest some in skills training but most in tools and materials. After four years, half practice a skilled trade. Relative to the control group, the program increases business assets by 57%, work hours by 17%, and earnings by 38%. Many also formalize their enterprises and hire labor. We see no effect, however, on social cohesion, ...

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  • KickStart Impact Evaluation: Cohort Study
    Last registered on February 09, 2016

    This trial is an impact evaluation assessing the effect of Kickstart International's irrigation pumps on farmer welfare in Kenya. The evaluation of the cohort study consists of a panel analysis of small scale farming households across 35 districts that bought the pump in 2009, 2011 and 2015. Baseline and midline data collection of the cohorts that bought pumps in 2009 and 2011 was carried out by IFPRI, while the 2015 endline was conducted by the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics. The attached document outlines the evaluation design, outcome variables and econometric methods Busara will use to assess the effect of the pump on income and assets, land management practices, food security and consumption, time allocation, as well as intra-household decision-making.

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  • The Impact of Improved Access to Formal Financial Institutions in Rural Tamil Nadu: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial
    Last registered on February 08, 2016

    Limited access to formal financial institutions is considered a constraint on the ability of poor households to pursue various socio-economic goals and manage negative income and health shocks. The current study will evaluate the impact of rural bank branch expansion at both the household and village level, using a randomized controlled trial. Researchers will evaluate a financial service delivery model that uses bank branches in villages to provide a full range of credit, savings, and insurance services to low and medium-income households. The study will assess the impact of financial access in this form on household and community economic outcomes, health, agricultural behavior and social networks. Together with partner organization IFMR Rural Channels, a rural financial servic...

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  • The impact of mentoring and life skills on secondary school progression and child labor among girls: A randomized controlled trial in Rajasthan, India
    Last registered on February 08, 2016

    Throughout the developing world, there are substantial gender differences in school attendance and the economic lives of children. Moreover, these differences generally widen as cohorts age as the gap between male and female enrollment increases. Female students are accordingly less likely than their male peers both to enter and to graduate from secondary school. This dropout risk is associated with vulnerability to child labor, forced labor, and human trafficking. This evaluation seeks to answer the question of whether life skills training and mentoring by older female role models, denoted “social mobilizers”, can improve school progression and non-cognitive skills for girls while reducing their engagement in child labor. The project is being implemented by Williams College in partn...

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  • Social Norm and Debt Repayment: Field Experiments in a Debt-collector Enterprise
    Last registered on February 07, 2016

    The study will consist of two field experiments in cooperation with Latvian debt-collector enterprise. The research will examine the extent to which a descriptive social norm and a personalization motivate consumers to pay back their debts rather than to give up and default. Both the effectiveness of communication and the content will be examined. It will provide information on the strenght of social norms regarding the financial discipline among the households in Latvia.

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  • Sports Betting in Uganda: Causes and Consequences
    Last registered on February 05, 2016

    Sports betting has become very popular across many countries in sub-Saharan Africa over the last decade. It is a multi-million dollar industry in many developing countries and continues to expand. This study looks at sports betting behavior among bettors in Kampala, Uganda and seeks to identify causal factors contributing to high betting intensity and prevalence. We will employ randomized treatments to identify possible behavioral biases contributing to high betting intensity. We will also employ quasi-experimental methods to analyze additional causes as well as the impacts of betting participation that cannot be explored experimentally.

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  • An Evaluation of Factors Affecting Antimalarial Drug Quality
    Last registered on February 04, 2016

    In partnership with researchers at the Mbarara University of Science and Technology, I conduct an audit study to test whether improved customer information about healthcare purchases lowers prices or changes quality. I send pairs of mystery shoppers to private sector drug outlets in Uganda to purchase antimalarial drugs according to randomized scripts. The scripts experimentally vary information about the patient's diagnosis (malaria) and/or about appropriate treatment (artemether-lumefantrine). All purchases are tested using spectrometer to determine whether they are substandard. That data are linked with additional survey data of vendors and real customers.

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  • What should the optimal intrauterine pressure be during diagnostic hysteroscopy? A randomised comparative study
    Last registered on February 04, 2016

    Hysteroscopy is a frequently used diagnostic tool used in the evaluation of infertile couples and intrauterine pathologies. There is no concensus on the optimal intrauterin pressure during hysteroscopy in the literature. The lower pressure leads to inadequate visualization however hihger pressure increase the completeness of procedure but increase the pain perceived by patient. We will conduct a randomised comparative study in which the hysteroscopy prucedure will be performed with three different pressure( 40 mmgh, 60 mmgh and 90 mmhg). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of procedures where adequate visibility was achieved during diagnostic outpatient hysteroscopy. The secondary outcome was the level of pain experienced by the patient as assessed using a visual analogue scale.

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  • Do we hold men more responsible than women? Data Collection round 2.
    Last registered on February 04, 2016

    This registration concerns the second round of data collection for a project where we study experimentally whether males are held more responsible for outcomes than females, using a novel design implemented on a representative sample of Americans. The participants make distributive choices involving men and women and we randomly manipulate the gender composition in the distributive situations. The registered pre-analysis plan should be read as an addition to the pre-analysis plan submitted to the AEA RCT registry on September 28, 2015, concerning the same project.

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