AEA RCT Registry currently lists 830 studies with locations in 97 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Does Development Aid Undermine Political Accountability in Bangladesh?
    Last registered on August 27, 2016

    We study political economy responses to a large scale intervention in Bangladesh, where four sub-districts consisting of 100 villages (12,000 households) were randomly assigned to control, information or subsidy treatments to encourage investments in improved sanitation. In theory, leaders may endogenously respond to large interventions by changing their allocation of effort, and their constituents’ views about the leader may rationally change as a result. In one intervention where the leaders’ role in program allocation was not clear to constituents, constituents appear to attribute credit to their local leader for a randomly assigned program. However, when subsidy assignment is clearly and transparently random, the lottery winners do not attribute any extra credit to the poli...

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  • Disconnected and Uninformed: Dissecting and Dismantling India’s Gender Gap in Political Participation
    Last registered on August 27, 2016

    Given the persistent gender gap in political participation in India despite several decades of targeted policy interventions, I propose to evaluate a new mechanism aimed at increasing women’s political participation. The proposed RCT – which draws upon significant pilot work – evaluates (1) the role of political information and exposure and (2) integration in social networks in mobilizing women politically and reducing the gender gap in political participation. Through a gender and politics training intervention with the NGO PRADAN, women will receive information about the political system and their rights and entitlements within this system and will be directly exposed to existing political institutions, with the aim of reducing informational barriers to political participation. The RC...

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  • Impact of Rainfall Insurance on Farmer Behavior in India
    Last registered on August 26, 2016

    Weather is a key source of income risk for many firms and households, particularly in emerging market economies. This paper studies how an innovative risk management instrument for hedging rainfall risk affects production decisions among a sample of Indian agricultural firms, using a randomized controlled trial approach. We find that the provision of insurance induces farmers to shift production towards higher-return but higher-risk cash crops, particularly amongst more educated farmers. Our results support the view that financial innovation may help mitigate the real effects of uninsured production risk. In a second experiment we elicit willingness to pay for insurance policies that differ in their contract terms, using the Becker-DeGroot-Marshak mechanism. Willingness-to...

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  • Measuring Experimenter Demand
    Last registered on August 26, 2016

    Experimenter demand effects pose an important challenge to understand and interpret results from laboratory and field studies. In this paper, we manipulate participants’ beliefs about the intentions and desires of the experimenters. In particular, we are interested in how far people’s behavior in economic games is elastic to experimenter demand. In our experiment, people are randomly assigned to play either a dictator game, an investment game or to complete a convex time budget. We randomly assign whether people will be exposed to positive, negative or no experimenter demand and whether the choices involve real money or are hypothetical.

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  • The Impact of Job-Specific Training on Short-Term Worker Performance: Evidence from a Field Experiment
    Last registered on August 25, 2016

    Remote and short-term work arrangements are increasingly common despite the limited incentives they provide for acquiring firm-specific knowledge. This study examines the importance and cost-effectiveness of firm-specific training for remote contract workers using a field experiment run among short-term, outside sales people employed by an insurance firm in Northern Kenya. In particular, I test whether whether giving these workers the option to invest in firm-specific training through a mobile training application affects their performance, retention, and subsequent firm earnings, and how this varies with monetary and competition-based incentives to invest in the training. Preliminary findings demonstrate that having access to firm-specific training significantly increases worker perfor...

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  • Stay the Course: Evaluating an Intervention to Promote Community College Persistence and Graduation Rates
    Last registered on August 25, 2016

    This study evaluates a community college intervention program, Stay the Course, that is designed to address the “life barriers” – as distinct from specific academic barriers – that challenge many economically-disadvantaged students. The goal of the study is to determine whether an intervention of this type is effective at increasing community college persistence and graduation rates. The key components of intervention are coaching/mentoring services and emergency financial assistance. The program is being run by a community service provider in agreement with a large community college in Fort Worth, TX. We will use administrative records to track student academic outcomes for at least three years post random assignment. The main outcomes of interest are total credit hours completed, re-e...

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  • Demand for Nontraditional Cookstoves in Bangladesh
    Last registered on August 24, 2016

    There are few marketing studies of social learning about new technologies in low income countries. This paper examines how learning through opinion leaders and social networks influences demand for non-traditional cookstoves – a technology with important health and environmental consequences for developing country populations. We conduct marketing interventions in rural Bangladesh to assess how stove adoption decisions respond to (a) learning the adoption choices of locally identified ‘opinion leaders’ and (b) learning about stove attributes and performance through social networks. We find that households generally draw negative inferences about stoves through social learning, and that social learning is more important for stoves with less evident benefits. In an institutional environm...

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  • A randomized controlled trial of a brief family-centered care program for hospitalized patients with bipolar disorder and their family caregivers
    Last registered on August 24, 2016

    Because of the bidirectional and entangled relationships between patients with bipolar disorder (BPD) and the family system, using family interventions has been emphasized. However, the effects of family interventions on family function and caregivers’ health-related outcomes have not been well investigated. This randomized controlled trial with 47 hospitalized patient-with-BPD/family-caregiver dyads at a medical center in northern Taiwan compared the effects of a brief family-centered care (BFCC) program with treatment-as-usual (TAU). In the experimental group, four 90-minute BFCC program sessions were provided twice a week for each hospitalized family dyad. Family caregivers in the TAU group were invited to attend a 60-minute family discussion group about violence and suicide preventi...

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  • Electoral reciprocity in programmatic redistribution: Evidence from Honduran experiments
    Last registered on August 23, 2016

    This paper analyzes the impact of Honduran conditional cash transfers on turnout and incumbent vote share in presidential elections, using two randomized experiments. Before the 2001 presidential elections, the PRAF-II experiment randomly assigned households in 40 of 70 municipalities to receive small conditional cash transfers, only intended to cover the costs of complying with education and health conditions (Galiani and McEwan, 2013; IFPRI, 2000). Then, in late 2011, the Bono 10,000 experiment randomly assigned 816 villages to three treatment arms. Of these, 150 of these were randomly selected for the treatment group, and another 150 were randomly selected for the control group. The former received the treatment immediately after the baseline was completed, and the latter received it...

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  • The Role of Information in Agricultural Technology Adoption: Experimental Evidence from Rice Farmers in Uganda
    Last registered on August 23, 2016

    Previous research identified information inefficiencies as a major constraint to sustainable crop intensification among rice farmers in Eastern Uganda. The fact that some farmers report not using certain inputs or techniques because they are not aware of them while others report they are aware of them but are not using them suggests information gaps at two levels. First, farmers may lack knowledge about the existence or use a particular input or technology. Second, a farmer may not be aware of the returns to using the technology. In this study we therefore try out two different information treatments at the individual level. In a first intervention, we show farmers the recommend practices and inputs in rice farming. In a second intervention, we point out the returns to investment in a s...

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