AEA RCT Registry currently lists 1874 studies with locations in 119 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Optimizing Payment Formulas for Results-Based Financing: Evidence from a Survey and a Lab-in-the-Field Experiment in Nigeria
    Last registered on July 18, 2018

    Results-based financing (RBF) programs for health in low and middle-income countries often offer financial incentives to health care providers or workers to increase the quantity of a selected set of health care services and/or quality measures. PBF programs can induce behavioral responses in several ways, e.g., by communicating what services are considered “priority” and/or by the financial incentives attached to the included measures. We survey health workers in Nigeria to examine whether they know about and understand an ongoing RBF program. We use an incentivized experiment to examine health workers’ response to the information and the financial incentives (rewards or penalties) implicit in RBF programs. Specifically, health workers are asked to read several partograph cases a...

  • Individual determinants of self protection among homeowners with(out) disaster risk insurance
    Last registered on July 18, 2018

    The focus of this paper is to examine how the financial incentives emanating from insurance compare with the influence of other behavioral motivations for investing in flood risk reduction. The online lab-in-the-field experiment among homeowners in floodplains (N=2000) will demonstrate the effects of individual characteristics on risk mitigation decisions of relevant decision-makers. The expected results can be used to inform policy makers and insurance companies about how to stimulate people who voluntarily have flood insurance coverage to better prepare for flood disasters.

  • Estimating the Demand for Entrepreneurship Programs: Experimental Evidence from Jamaica.
    Last registered on July 18, 2018

    The goal of this project is to understand whether it is possible and desirable to charge a positive price for business-training programs. We elicit willingness to pay for a course for entrepreneurs in Jamaica. First, we estimate the demand schedule for the program. Second, we study whether willingness to pay can act as a screening device to select those entrepreneurs who would benefit the most from participation in training programs. Third, we test whether there is a sunk-cost effect by which those who pay a higher price for the program exercise more effort (attend the training more regularly) and achieve higher returns. This project is relevant to understand whether we can increase the effect of business-training programs by targeting, and whether providers can achieve financial sustai...

  • Information and Public Service Provision: Experimental Evidence from School WASH Services in Bangladesh
    Last registered on July 17, 2018

    Can information and community-based monitoring improve the delivery of public services? This study evaluates the Annotated Water Integrity Scan (AWIS), a participatory approach to assess governance risks in public service provision, identify priority risks and define action plans. The intervention is scalable, replicable and adaptable to a wide range of contexts: in this case, the provision of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) services in Bangladeshi schools.

  • The Consequences of Legal Debt: Evidence from a Field Experiment
    Last registered on July 17, 2018

    This trial investigates whether relief from legal financial obligations associated with misdemeanor criminal offenses leads to decreased criminal justice system involvement and improved labor market outcomes.

  • Beliefs about Racial Discrimination: Representative Evidence
    Last registered on July 17, 2018

    This paper provides representative evidence on people's beliefs about the extent of racial discrimination in the United States and to what extent these beliefs drive support for affirmative action policies. We report evidence from two separate experiments. In the first experiment, we elicit incentivized beliefs about how likely resumes with black-sounding names are to receive a callback for an interview relative to resumes with white-sounding names. We then provide a random subset of our respondents with the true statistic and investigate how this affects support for affirmative action policies. To deal with experimenter demand effects, we perform a second experiment where the key outcome questions are only asked one week later in an obfuscated follow-up study.

  • What Motivates Political Activists? Evidence From a Field Experiment
    Last registered on July 17, 2018

    See pre-analysis plan.

  • To Assess the Effectiveness of Various Communication Strategies for Improving Childhood Pneumonia Case Management: A Community Based Behavioral Open Labeled Trial in Rural Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
    Last registered on July 16, 2018

    Title of the research proposal project To Assess the Effectiveness of Various Communication Strategies for Improving Childhood Pneumonia Case Management: A Community Based Behavioral Open Labeled Trial in Rural Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India Executive Summary Background: Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide and in India. Many of these deaths can be averted by creating awareness in the community about early symptoms of CAP and by ensuring availability of round the clock, quality health care. Hypothesis Strengthening of public health system to provide sustainable quality care for cases of childhood pneumonia (CAP) followed by strategic dissemination of validated messages to community may improve care seeking behavi...

  • Randomized Control Trial of a Comprehensive Financial Inclusion Program in Papua New Guinea
    Last registered on July 16, 2018

    This study is a randomized control trial evaluation of a comprehensive financial inclusion program in Papua New Guinea.

  • Social identity and career choices
    Last registered on July 16, 2018

    How does social identity affect career choices? Why do men not apply to jobs traditionally dominated by women? While there is a rich and growing literature on stereotypes and aspirations, there are a few studies investigating how counter-stereotypical messages in crucial moments of choice can actually induce more people to consider and even pursue a career which is uncommon for their group of origin. I design an experiment in collaboration with a UK organization operating in a sector traditionally made of more than 75% of women. The experiment randomly assigns people interested in applying to the organization in different treatment groups, which manipulate the content of an invitation-to-apply email. The different treatments are meant to investigate the extent to which social identity...