AEA RCT Registry currently lists 2254 studies with locations in 124 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Does the way how Foreign Aid is framed effect public opinion about aid? Evidence from a Randomised Control Trial in Australia
    Last registered on January 22, 2019

    This survey experiment focuses on whether the way how Foreign Aid is framed effects public opinion about aid.

  • Cross country evidence about perceptions of inequality and support for redistribution
    Last registered on January 22, 2019

    This study explores whether preferences for redistribution are reduced because people underestimate the level of inequality and overestimate the degree of social mobility in their country. In addition, it examines the degree that an individual’s perceived place in the income distribution effects their support for redistribution. This research will be conducted through online surveys in 10 countries whereby ‘information interventions’ are provided to randomly selected treatment groups to see the impact on their preferences for redistribution. These information interventions are motivated by existing surveys that have shown misperceptions of inequality and mobility exist in many countries around the world.

  • Preferences for redistribution and perceptions of inequality in Australia
    Last registered on January 22, 2019

    This project explores whether preferences for redistribution in Australia are reduced because people underestimate the level of inequality and overestimate the degree of social mobility. Studying these concepts interactively is consistent with a number of seminal models and provides important additional insight. This research will be conducted through an online experiment in Australia whereby ‘information interventions’ about inequality, mobility and a respondent's place in the distribution are provided to randomly selected treatment groups to see the impact on their preferences for redistribution. These information interventions are motivated by misperceptions of inequality and mobility that were revealed in a 2014 nationally representative survey (Norton et al, 2014).

  • Preferences for redistribution and perceptions of inequality in Indonesia
    Last registered on January 22, 2019

    This project explores whether preferences for redistribution in Indonesia are reduced because people underestimate the level of inequality and overestimate the degree of social mobility. Studying these concepts interactively is consistent with a number of seminal models and provides important additional insight. This research will be conducted through an online experiment in Indonesia whereby ‘information interventions’ about inequality and mobility are provided to randomly selected treatment groups to see the impact on their preferences for redistribution. These information interventions are motivated by misperceptions of inequality and mobility that were revealed in a 2014 nationally representative survey.

  • Knowledge and Teacher Loan Forgiveness and Teacher Retention
    Last registered on January 21, 2019

    Federal loan forgiveness programs for teachers are an underutilized resource for recruiting and retaining teachers in high-need schools. Increasing awareness and participation in these programs can be an effective strategy to improve teacher quality in high-poverty public schools in Michigan. We intend to contact 11,000 teachers in Michigan with information about the Teacher Loan Forgiveness program (TLF) and their eligibility. We want to know if providing eligible teachers with clear, timely information about TLF and/or support in submitting applications will: (a) increase the fraction of eligible teachers who apply for and obtain TLF; and (b) increase teacher retention in high-needs public schools in Michigan.

  • Improving Aspirations, Educational Attainment and Health through Peer Educators and Networks
    Last registered on January 21, 2019

    One in four births in the Brazilian state of Bahia are from women between the ages of 15 and 19. These teenage pregnancies result in high school dropout rates. This evaluation will experimentally measure the impact of a peer-led high school program designed to prevent teenage pregnancies and help students complete high school. The intervention entails increasing aspirations, encouraging educational attainment, building self-esteem and providing information about reproductive health, so as to help pupils set their life goals. From a sample of 135 high schools in the state capital, 90 are randomly selected to receive the program. Training is provided to teams of peer educators who then disseminate the information in their schools. We experimentally measure the effectiveness of three peer ...

  • Social identity and career choices
    Last registered on January 20, 2019

    How does social identity affect career choices? Why do men not apply to jobs traditionally dominated by women? While there is a rich and growing literature on stereotypes and aspirations, there are a few studies investigating how counter-stereotypical messages in crucial moments of choice can actually induce more people to consider and even pursue a career which is uncommon for their group of origin. I design an experiment in collaboration with a UK organization operating in a sector traditionally made of more than 75% of women. The experiment randomly assigns people interested in applying to the organization in different treatment groups, which manipulate the content of an invitation-to-apply email. The different treatments are meant to investigate the extent to which social identity...

  • Public goods games under a nonlinear tax system with an interior dominant strategy equilibrium
    Last registered on January 18, 2019

    In the standard Voluntary Contribution Mechanism (Hichri 2004), a linear public goods game, the dominant strategy equilibrium is to donate zero; therefore, any error or noise will appear to be altruism. I avoid this ``corner critique'' (Laury and Holt 2008) by using a nonlinear tax system to get an interior Nash equilibrium. It is also possible to do this by means of a threshold for the good to be provided; however, this induces a multiplicity of equilibria. My method induces a unique, sharp dominant strategy equilibrium, in which a player's best response does not depend on any other players' choices. Furthermore, by using a differentiable payoff function, I can measure the marginal cost of deviation from the dominant strategy equilibrium, inferring a willingness-to-pay for other-regard...

  • Mobile Monitoring for Teachers: Can Calls Improve Learning Outcomes for Primary School Students in Niger
    Last registered on January 18, 2019

    In remote rural areas of developing countries, teacher absenteeism is a widespread problem for both governmental and non-governmental programs. Based upon a pilot in Niger with an adult education program, this study will randomly assign schools to a mobile phone monitoring intervention that calls primary school teachers, the principal, the village chief and two parents.

  • Motivating Contributions to Public Information Goods: A Field Experiment at Wikipedia
    Last registered on January 18, 2019

    Wikipedia is among the most important information sources for the general public. Motivating domain experts to contribute to Wikipedia can improve the accuracy and completeness of its content. In a field experiment at Wikipedia, we examine individual motivations to contribute to public information goods. Using a 2-by-3 factorial design, we vary the expectation on the number of recipients along one dimension and the amount of private benefit along the other dimension. In the analysis, we will investigate how our interventions affect the experts' willingness to participate and contribution measured by both quantity and quality.