AEA RCT Registry currently lists 861 studies with locations in 101 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Utilizing Community Health Workers to Increase Use of ORS and Zinc to Treat Child Diarrhea in Uganda
    Last registered on September 27, 2016

    Oral rehydration salts (ORS) and zinc are highly effective at preventing child mortality from diarrhea yet they are widely underused throughout sub-Saharan Africa. This research aims to test the impact of a novel preemptive home-delivery intervention aimed at increasing the use of ORS and zinc for child diarrhea in Uganda. The intervention aims to increase availability of ORS and zinc and reduce barriers to access by having BRAC's community health promoters (CHPs) deliver the products directly to households for free prior to a diarrhea episode. Under this set-up, the products will be readily available for free immediately after a child comes down with diarrhea. Moreover, we will disentangle the mechanisms through which the intervention could change product use by using a multi-armed app...

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  • The Impact of LinkedIn on Disconnected Young Work-Seekers: Evidence from South Africa
    Last registered on September 27, 2016

    This document outlines a plan for a labor market intervention being conducted in several cities across South Africa in cooperation with the Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator. Randomly altering the curriculum of Harambee's corporate work readiness training program to include a LinkedIn (the digital professional networking site) component will allow researchers to estimate the effect of the LinkedIn "treatment" on the long-run employment outcomes, professional networks, educational investments, and career expectations and aspirations of young work-seekers in South Africa.

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  • Savings Constraints and Microenterprise Development: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya
    Last registered on September 27, 2016

    Does limited access to formal savings services impede business growth in poor countries? To shed light on this question, we randomized access to noninterest-bearing bank accounts among two types of self-employed individuals in rural Kenya: market vendors (who are mostly women) and men working as bicycle taxi drivers. Despite large withdrawal fees, a substantial share of market women used the accounts, were able to save more, and increased their productive investment and private expenditures. We see no impact for bicycletaxi drivers. These results imply significant barriers to savings and investment for market women in our study context.

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  • Direct Democracy and Local Public Goods in Indonesia
    Last registered on September 27, 2016

    This article presents an experiment in which 49 Indonesian villages were randomly assigned to choose development projects through either representative-based meetings or direct election-based plebiscites. Plebiscites resulted in dramatically higher satisfaction among villagers, increased knowledge about the project, greater perceived benefits, and higher reported willingness to contribute. Changing the political mechanism had much smaller effects on the actual projects selected, with some evidence that plebiscites resulted in projects chosen by women being located in poorer areas. The results suggest that direct participation in political decision making can substantially increase satisfaction and legitimacy.

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  • Does Technology Make the Accumulation of Human Capital More Price Elastic? Evidence from a Field Experiment with 171 Solar-Electrified Schools in Tanzania
    Last registered on September 27, 2016

    This research implements a randomized-controlled trial in 171 secondary schools (~50,000 students) in northern Tanzania. The research cross-randomizes the provision of math textbooks, educational videos, and scholarship programs.

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  • Responsiveness of Public Administration to Behavioral Appeals - Evidence From a Field Experiment in Germany
    Last registered on September 27, 2016

    How responsive are public administration institutions to different types of "behavioral" appeals? To study this question, we run a field experiment with public administrations in Germany. We write letters to all local-level tax authorities which include a request by our research institution to share non-confidential data for research purposes. The data-request letters embed a field experiment with four different groups in order to study if public administrations are responsive to some of the most common types of “behavioral” appeals: social norms, shaming and deterrence. In the social norm treatment, we inform tax authorities about the fact that we already received data from a non-negligible number of tax authorities. In the shaming treatment, we inform that the resulting research publi...

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  • We Can Manage
    Last registered on September 27, 2016

    The ambition of this project is to evaluate the impact of an inclusive microfinance program called 'We can manage!', targeting disabled people in rural Uganda. The idea behind the program, which also has a gender focus, is to reduce financial barriers and build capacity and confidence among the participants in the microfinance program, and to reduce prejudice in society by demonstrating the ability of disabled to manage and mobilize resources. The key question of our research is: Does the program lead to economic empowerment and increased well-being? And: Does the program lead to changes in business attitudes and in attitudes to disability and gender among the disabled?

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  • Is self-other decision making affected by the source of the income?
    Last registered on September 27, 2016

    To our knowledge, there is no study examining the relationship between decision making on behalf of others and the source of the income. For this reason, we will in our thesis examine whether the degree of risk taking on behalf of others depends on the source of the income. The results of this research will contribute to the understanding of how people make risky decisions on behalf of others, which in particular could be interesting for explaining decisions made by - for example - hedge fund managers.

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  • The Effect of Informative Letters on the Prescription and Receipt of Seroquel
    Last registered on September 25, 2016

    Abusive prescribing exposes patients to unnecessary health risks and results in wasteful public expenditures. This study will evaluate an innovative approach to fighting abusive prescription: sending letters to suspected inappropriate prescribers warning them that they are outliers compared to their peers and have been flagged for review. The study will target high prescribers of Seroquel (Quetiapine), an atypical antipsychotic. Using claims data, we will assess the effect of the letters on prescribing of Seroquel, receipt of Seroquel by patients, substitution behavior by prescribers and patients, and health outcomes of patients.

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  • Private vs. Public Mental Accounts: Experimental Evidence from Savings Groups in Colombia
    Last registered on September 25, 2016

    I designed and implemented a Randomized Controlled Trial to study whether simple modifications to the framing and labeling of a commitment savings product affected savings accumulations and other outcomes of low-income individuals in newly-formed Village Savings and Loan Associations in Colombia. Motivated by insights from behavioral economics, the study tests if behavioral responses vary depending on whether subjects are led to label and create ‘mental savings accounts’ in private or public ways. Individuals in the private-labeling treatment groups were led to label their savings as earmarked for a particular purpose and to state savings accumulation targets, information which was shared only privately with a member of the research team. Individuals in the public-labeling treatment gro...

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