AEA RCT Registry currently lists 8937 studies with locations in 169 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Consumer Beliefs about Central Bank Inflation Forecasts
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    Why do consumers' inflation expectations diverge so much from central banks' forecasts? Using new surveys, we provide evidence that German consumers perceive the ECB's inflation forecasts to be less accurate and more optimistic than they are. Using information experiments, we show that such beliefs are causally related to inflation expectations. Information about inflation forecasts also promotes trust in the ECB, which we measure directly with a generic question, and indirectly with a new six-item questionnaire. Communication is effective in changing beliefs about the credibility of the target, the honesty of the ECB, and the personal benefits of monetary policy.

  • Case Control Study for Nudge in School Canteens
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    This paper tackles the issue of ongoing food waste in school canteens. We design a case control study for applying nudge in school canteens to curb food waste. Firstly, we write a protocol for a pilot study. Then, we propose an extended protocol for a large scale experiment. Our main contribution to the research field is to provide a nudge that is interactive. It is a revisited "Climate Fresk" between searchers, school canteen staff, teachers and children aged from 11 years old to 15 years old. We expect to reduce significantly the amount of food waste during the one-month experiment.

  • How to encourage formal work?
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    This study aims to experimentally test whether financial constraint, attractiveness of worker benefits, and information and behavioural frictions are significant barriers to social security participation.

  • Gender Debiasing the Workplace: Experimental Evidence from Cognitive Workshops in Ethiopia
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    We propose to evaluate the impact of a gender debiasing program on hiring and training among formal firms in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. As part of a large-scale government program that will connect low-skill youths to apprenticeships in local firms, firm managers participate in a series of workshops that address common cognitive biases that may lead to gender-biased treatment in the workplace: selection neglect, attribution bias, and environment design bias. By varying whether firms receive the training prior or after candidate selection, we can separately study how the program changes the selection and training of young workers. Using rich administrative data on firm preferences over different candidates and primary data that we collect through surveys and observation, we will study how th...

  • Redetermination and Enrollment: Evidence at Work (RENEW)
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    Take-up of safety net programs in the United States is often incomplete, ranging from 84% for SNAP and Medicaid adults to 25% for TANF. Administrative hassles involved with proving initial and continued eligibility, which often require substantial effort by enrollees, may contribute to the large number of eligible but unenrolled individuals and families. The expiration of the nationwide public health emergency related to COVID-19 will trigger eligibility redeterminations for tens of millions of American households and will require many of these households to go through a burdensome and confusing eligibility redetermination process. We propose to study the effect of these administrative hassles in the Medicaid program, where it is estimated that 89 million beneficiaries will be going thr...

  • Altruism, Materialism, and Decision Making: Effects on Risk and Time Preferences
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    This study investigates how altruism (intrinsic motivation) and materialism (extrinsic motivation) influence decision-making, specifically focusing on risk tolerance and time preferences. We manipulate participants' exposure to altruistic and materialistic primes and examine their impact on financial decision-making. Using an online experimental design, participants are randomly assigned to one of three groups: a control group, a group primed with materialism, and a group primed with altruism using pre-validated videos. Subsequently, participants complete multiple price list choices to assess their risk tolerance and time preferences.

  • Factors Shaping Macroeconomic Expectations
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    This project aims to understand how people form beliefs about the macroeconomy, particularly developments in inflation and house prices. We propose that memories of past experiences, both relevant and potentially irrelevant, shape these beliefs. Suppose an individual is forecasting whether the inflation rate over the next twelve months will be high (i.e., above a certain threshold). We argue that the individual will rely, in part, on past experiences that have some similarity to the hypothesis they are trying to imagine (elevated levels of inflation). Our theory proposes that individuals who have personal experience with very similar things – for instance, financial struggles – will have an easier time imagining a future with higher levels of inflation, boosting their estimates of the l...

  • Willingness to compensate for unequal circumstances
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    We conduct a survey to understand the valuation that individuals make when deciding how much to transfer to compensate for different circumstances. To do this we present hypothetical scenarios where the respondent has to allocate money to two potential beneficiaries. The beneficiaries are equal in all their characteristics but differ on one silent attribute associated with a circumstance. In addition, we randomly assign some individuals to receive information about the effort the potential beneficiaries put into searching for a job. The survey collects information surveying young people. On one hand, our results will provide evidence about how individuals value different circumstances. In addition, results will allow us to understand how individuals perceive the relationship between eff...

  • The Good Council: Deliberating inequality in a field experiment
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    This document describes the research design and analysis strategy of our field experiment, designed around a citizens’ assembly to evaluate the impact of deliberative democracy on preferences for redistribution. The citizens’ assembly, Good Council (“Guter Rat”) takes place in 2024 in Austria. It consists of 50 residents of Austria who are selected to convene and develop ideas for addressing economic inequality, deciding on allocating an endowment of EUR 25 million to purposes conducive to this goal. The Good Council is an example of deliberative democracy, where participants “redistribute” a significant sum donated by a high-net-worth individual. We study whether participation in a citizens’ assembly affects (redistributive) policy preferences and related outcomes of participants. In p...

  • Stigma and Labor Supply
    Last registered on June 25, 2024

    Perceptions of discrimination and of one's own identity can affect how jobseekers behave. We outline a 3-stage labor market experiment in a Brazilian slum (where home address is a stigma, a mark used to discriminate) to understand how jobseekers behave in the labor market in response to changes the salience of their stigma.