AEA RCT Registry currently lists 663 studies with locations in 91 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Protective effect of Fentanyl on oropharyngeal trauma in neonatal intubation
    Last registered on May 06, 2016

    Background: Endotracheal intubation is frequently performed in neonatal intensive care units. It is extremely distressing and painful and has been associated with significant neonatal morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Fentanyl as a premedication and its impact in accelerating the endotracheal intubation in neonates at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: In this double blind randomized controlled trial study, newborns admitted to NICU of Alzahra Hospital ,Izadi Hospital and Hazrat Masumeh Hospital (in Qom city), requiring an elective endotracheal intubation were randomly assigned in two groups. For the case group Fentanyl was administered 3 mcg/kg slow IV push in 1 mL normal saline in five minutes before intubation, and the control...

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  • Technology Adoption in Education: Usage, Spillovers and Student Achievement
    Last registered on May 06, 2016

    The end users of new technologies may be distinct from the government administrators in control of procurement. Given growing spending on education technologies in particular, an important question is whether these products, once purchased, are adopted by their end users and are effective in practice. This paper studies the adoption, diffusion, and effects of one type of technology that has received large private-sector investments: school-to-parent communication technologies. Previous research shows that that providing detailed information to parents about their child's academic performance can improve student achievement. Many school districts accomplish this at scale via technology that places student information online, but the adoption of this technology by parents is unknown. ...

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  • Comparing the Complications of Three Methods of Furosemide Administered to Premature Neonates Suffering from Patent Ductus Arteriosus
    Last registered on May 06, 2016

    Abstract Background: Patent dactus arteriosus (PDA) needs treatment for cases whose ducts are not closed spontaneously. Furosemide reduces preload, but there is still controversy regarding the protocol of its administration between pediatricians and pediatric cardiologists. We aimed to compare renal complications and electrolyte imbalance of three protocols of administering furosemide. Methods: In this prospective study, 127 preterm neonates with PDA were randomly assigned into three different groups: 2 mg/kg very slow infusion Furosemide was given intravenously to 47 neonates slow infusion every other day (group A), 1 mg/kg very slow infusion to 39 neonates every day (group B), and 0.5 mg/kg per dose bolus doses twice a day to 41 neonates (group C) for about 14 days. Then, all partic...

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  • Electoral Promises in the Philippines
    Last registered on May 05, 2016

    This project focuses on electoral promises and their impacts in municipal elections of the Philippines. The core of the project - conducted in collaboration with the Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting - relies on conducting an informational treatment in the context of the 2016 mayoral elections in the Ilocos Sur and Ilocos Norte regions of the country. We followed a similar approach in trial AEARCTR-0000688 which studied the 2013 elections, research upon which this project builds. Voters in randomly selected villages will receive information on the promises of candidates running in the 2016 elections and a random subset of them will also be reminded of the promises made by candidates ahead of the 2013 elections. The project seeks to answer questions such as: 1. ...

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  • Health education for microcredit clients in Peru: a randomized controlled trial
    Last registered on May 05, 2016

    BACKGROUND: Poverty, lack of female empowerment, and lack of education are major risk factors for childhood illness worldwide. Microcredit programs, by offering small loans to poor individuals, attempt to address the first two of these risk factors, poverty and gender disparity. They provide clients, usually women, with a means to invest in their businesses and support their families. This study investigates the health effects of also addressing the remaining risk factor, lack of knowledge about important health issues, through randomization of members of a microcredit organization to receive a health education module based on the World Health Organization’s Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) community intervention. METHODS: Baseline data were collected in February 200...

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  • Promoting Early Grade Reading & Numeracy in Tanzania: KiuFunza II
    Last registered on May 04, 2016

    Overall student learning levels remain low across East Africa, despite a decade plus of major reforms and significant new investments in public education. In recent years, teacher performance pay has received an increasing amount attention as a means of improving student learning. Yet the current evidence on teacher performance pay is at best mixed, with some studies finding large positive effects, and others finding little or no effects at all. However, these studies are not directly comparable as they are performed in different contexts, with different incentive structures, and different budgets. In the KiuFunza II RCT we evaluate two different teacher incentive programs implemented in 180 randomly selected government primary schools across ten districts in Tanzania, focusing on E...

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  • Preventing intimate-partner violence: Impact Evaluation of Engaging Men through Accountable Practice in Eastern DRC
    Last registered on May 04, 2016

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the impact of Engaging Men in Accountable Practice (EMAP) on the prevention of violence against women and girls in North and South Kivu (DRC). The study is conducted jointly by the World Bank’s Africa Gender Innovation Lab and the International Rescue Committee (IRC). EMAP is a program developed and implemented by the IRC to engage men to reflect on how they can reduce and prevent intimate partner violence through 16 weekly group discussion sessions. The study is a cluster randomized control trial in which two groups of 25 self-selected men in 15 communities receive the EMAP intervention while in 15 other communities, 50 self-selected men receive an alternative intervention. Key outcomes examined include: (i) Experience of past year physical, se...

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  • Assessing the classroom wide impacts of a mental health program for disruptive students.
    Last registered on May 03, 2016

    There has been a lot of research studying whether students can benefit from being exposed to cognitively more able peers. On the other hand, there has been much less research studying whether students can be hampered by disruptive peers. In this study we measure the effects of "Habilidades para la vida", a program aiming to improve the classroom behaviour of the most disruptive students in 2nd grade in Chile. We will study the effects of this program on disruptive students, on their teachers, and on their non-disruptive classmates.

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  • Relative merit-based scholarships, complementarities and peer effects in primary schools: Evidence from Malawi
    Last registered on May 03, 2016

    This study consists of a randomized evaluation of several programs to encourage academic achievement among upper-primary school students (grades 4-8) in rural Malawi. In each of the two years of the study different programs are being evaluated. In Year 1, two scholarship programs are compared with a control group. The first is a “relative” merit-based scholarship program which provides rewards to students based on performance relative to a comparison group with similar baseline test scores. The second is a standard merit-based scholarship program in which students with the top overall test scores receive a scholarship. In addition to the scholarship programs, information on a student's rank is randomly provided to a randomly selected half of the students to examine the impact of providi...

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  • Addressing gender biases and social identity in the technology sector in Peru
    Last registered on May 03, 2016

    Social identity considerations and norms may affect behavior and preferences of disadvantaged groups, perpetuating gaps in economic outcomes. In this research, we want to understand whether there are any pre-existing biases or missing information that preclude women from attempting to apply for training and a career in the high growth technology sector in Peru. These could come from misperceptions on women’s abilities to pursue a career in the tech sector, or from lack of role models or appropriate networks. In order to understand what are the barriers to pursuing a career in the tech sector, we are randomly varying the recruitment message to potential interested applicants to a 5 month “coding” bootcamp and leadership training program, offered only to women. In addition to a control g...

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