AEA RCT Registry currently lists 1141 studies with locations in 106 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Supply Chain Development for Sanitation in Tanzania
    Last registered on March 27, 2017

    In rural Tanzania, approximately 80% of the population has access to some sort of basic latrine, though the majority of these latrines do not meet the UNICEF-WHO Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) definitions of improved. The low quality of most rural sanitation facilities contributes to poor public health and, thereby, hinders economic growth. To address these concerns, the Government of Tanzania launched the National Sanitation Campaign to increase the proportion of rural households with improved sanitation. Latrine slabs (SanPlats) were designed at relatively low-cost and introduced to provide a smooth, easily cleaned, and safe opening for pit latrines. Several sanitation campaigns have promoted demand for SanPlats; however, efficient systems for supplying SanPlats currently do not e...

  • Improving tax compliance: deductions for work related expenses in income tax returns filed through tax agents
    Last registered on March 26, 2017

    Australians can claim income tax deductions when they incur costs in the course of earning income (e.g., vehicle and other work-related travel costs). Work related expenses are the most common deduction claimed by Australians. In 2014-15 total claims amounted to a total of $21 billion. The majority of Australian taxpayers that claim work-related expenses in their income tax returns lodge these forms through a registered tax agent. This trial, delivered in collaboration with the Australian Tax Office (ATO), will test a new method, informed by behavioural insights, aimed at supporting Australians to lodge accurate work related expense claims. The trial will test the effectiveness of a letter sent to tax agents reminding them the ATO has a data analytics system that identifies larger-th...

  • Estimating the Demand for Entrepreneurship Programs: Experimental Evidence from Jamaica.
    Last registered on March 26, 2017

    The goal of this project is to understand whether it is possible and desirable to charge a positive price for business-training programs. We elicit willingness to pay for a course for entrepreneurs in Jamaica. First, we estimate the demand schedule for the program. Second, we study whether willingness to pay can act as a screening device to select those entrepreneurs who would benefit the most from participation in training programs. Third, we test whether there is a sunk-cost effect by which those who pay a higher price for the program exercise more effort (attend the training more regularly) and achieve higher returns. This project is relevant to understand whether we can increase the effect of business-training programs by targeting, and whether providers can achieve financial sustai...

  • Incentivizing Self-Control
    Last registered on March 25, 2017

    We give students the possibility to select a goal grade for their course. Students are told that if they reach their goal grade or higher, they will be paid a prize. We will compare the chosen goals with their past grades and with the goals selected by another group of students who are not incentivized. Finally, we will test whether such incentivized goals have any impact in the students' course performance with respect to a group that chose non-incentivized goals and a control group.

  • Every child counts! Towards a scalable curriculum for early mathematics.
    Last registered on March 25, 2017

    The performance of primary schools in developing countries is weak, especially for the poor. This can be partly attributed to initial differences, which are later magnified by the school system (Banerjee & Duflo, 2011). The massive expansion in school attendance in developing countries has not been matched by increases in school achievement for the poor. In India, 75% of children in grade five cannot perform simple arithmetic and 53% cannot read a grade-two level paragraph (ASER: Pratham, 2013). Because poor children have especially weak preparation for school but strong non-symbolic numerical and geometrical abilities (Spelke, 2011), preschool is a promising time to intervene, with little established curricula. Yet, there is little evidence on effective school-readiness curricula for ...

  • Model of Reading Engagement
    Last registered on March 24, 2017

    Despite investing millions of dollars in large-scale literacy interventions and programs, researchers, policymakers, and educators are struggling to improve low-income children’s reading comprehension outcomes. In urban districts like Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina (CMS), only 27% of low-income children read proficiently on the Grade 4 National Assessment of Reading, which assesses students’ reading comprehension—that is, their ability to form a deep understanding of science and social studies texts. To address the challenge of accelerating low-income children’s reading comprehension, district leaders in Charlotte, NC have undertaken a strategic plan to improve students’ ability to read and write with evidence in response to informational text. Despite the progress made to date, ...

  • Knowledge and Performance Pay - A Field Experiment with a Large Retail-Chain
    Last registered on March 24, 2017

    Within a large retail chain we introduce a bonus payment for store managers and provide knowledge about the production function, implementing a 2x2 experimental design. The bonus is based on the store’s profit contribution margin (= sales - costs of goods sold - inventory shrinkage - personnel costs). Store managers in one region in South-West Germany are randomly assigned to one of four treatments. 25% of store managers serve as the control group. 25% of store managers receive a bonus based on the contribution margin. Another 25% of store managers get access to an online training on the contribution margin as well as novel information about the profit margins of all products in the store. The remaining 25% receive both, the bonus and the information about the production function. B...

  • Monitoring and Performance Pay - A Field Experiment with a Large Retail-Chain
    Last registered on March 24, 2017

    Within a large retail chain we introduce a bonus payment and a novel monitoring scheme for store managers, implementing a 2x2 experimental design. The bonus is based on the store’s profit contribution margin (= sales - costs of goods sold - inventory shrinkage - personnel costs). The monitoring scheme is based on systematic biweekly conversation with the respective district manager about the development of the contribution margin. Store managers in one region in Northern Germany are randomly assigned to one of four treatments. 25% of store managers receive a bonus based on the contribution margin. Another 25% of store managers are assigned to systematic biweekly conversations with their district managers about their actions taken during the past two weeks to influence the contribution...

  • Autonomy and Performance Pay - A Field Experiment with a Large Retail Chain
    Last registered on March 24, 2017

    Within a large retail chain we introduce a bonus payment and provide more autonomy in decision making for store managers, implementing a 2x2 experimental design. The bonus is based on the store’s profit contribution margin (= sales - costs of goods sold - inventory shrinkage - personnel costs). Store managers in one region in South-East Germany are randomly assigned to one of four treatments. 25% of store managers receive a bonus based on the contribution margin. Another 25% of store managers receive more autonomy in their work by allowing them to decide on the items placed in front of the cash desk. 25% of store managers receive both, the bonus and the additional autonomy. The remaining 25% serve as control group. Based on a theoretical model we study the following hypotheses: The b...

  • Giving When Responsible For Others' Risks
    Last registered on March 24, 2017

    This project focuses on impacts of social preferences on other-regarding risk preferences. In other words, this project will test whether people who care more about social welfare would show different other-regarding risk preferences, than those who care less about social welfare. On the other hand, this project also sheds light upon institutional effects on other-regarding risk preferences. That is, given one's social preferences whether s/he would show different other-regarding risk preferences under the two different institutions: one is where people self select to be decision maker of social risky decisions, the other situation is where people are all asked to make social risky decisions. Additionally, this project will explore whether social preferences influence the discrepancy be...