AEA RCT Registry currently lists 692 studies with locations in 91 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Washing Machines, Gender Roles and Female Empowerment in Colombia
    Last registered on May 29, 2016

    Despite the recent rapid growth in female labor market participation, poor households in developing countries exhibit a highly asymmetric distribution of household production efforts across genders. Moreover, the poorest of these households cannot afford purchasing labor-saving technologies such as laundry machines. As a result, females have substituted away from leisure, to accomodate their increased labor supply and limited reduction in household labor. We explore whether the limited extent of redistribution of home production efforts between men and women in these households is related to strongly held gender norms regarding home work, and the extent to which these shared beliefs can respond to the availability and experience with labor-saving home production technologies. With this ...

    View Trial
  • Citizen Demand for Corruption: Evidence from Tolls in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
    Last registered on May 29, 2016

    This proposed study examines the determinants of petty corruption in the DRC, a substantial source of lost revenue for the government. In pilot data, 42% of motorcycle taxi drivers reported paying less than the official rate at tolls. To explain this high rate of non-compliance, we randomly offer motorcycle taxi drivers one of three incentives to obtain an official receipt at the toll, or a control condition. The incentives are: a payment to the driver or one of two donation-based incentives designed to shift the perceived value of tax compliance. We cross randomize these treatments with three other treatments: two different norms treatments and incentives for toll officer to issue more receipts.

    View Trial
  • Incentives Work: Getting Teachers to Come to School
    Last registered on May 27, 2016

    We use a randomized experiment and a structural model to test whether monitoring and financial incentives can reduce teacher absence and increase learning in India. In treatment schools, teachers’ attendance was monitored daily using cameras, and their salaries were made a nonlinear function of attendance. Teacher absenteeism in the treatment group fell by 21 percentage points relative to the control group, and the children’s test scores increased by 0.17 standard deviations. We estimate a structural dynamic labor supply model and find that teachers respond strongly to financial incentives. Our model is used to compute cost-minimizing compensation policies.

    View Trial
  • Testing the Impact of Access to Basic Bank Accounts: A Randomized Field Experiment in three countries
    Last registered on May 27, 2016

    To examine the impact of expanding access to basic bank accounts, we set up three randomized evaluations in rural areas of Malawi, Uganda, and Chile. In each study site, we sample around 2,000 unbanked households living within reach of the branch, and sponsor basic accounts at local bank branches for a randomly selected half of them. We examine take-up of the accounts. In Malawi and Uganda, we use three rounds of follow-up surveys to study treatment effects on total savings as well as downstream outcomes over two years.

    View Trial
  • The Causal Impact of the Judiciary on Economic Activity: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya
    Last registered on May 24, 2016

    This paper presents the pre-analysis plan of a randomized intervention providing free legal representation to a treatment group of small scale farmers in a rural community of Kenya. Our hypothesis is that legal representation will increase access to the judiciary, the security of property rights, investment, agricultural production, and thus decrease poverty.

    View Trial
  • Electoral competition and political rents in the lab
    Last registered on May 24, 2016

    We investigate a rent-taking game between two candidates in a laboratory experiment. We are particularly interested in the interaction between noise and exogenous rents on rent-taking behavior.

    View Trial
  • Conditional Cash Transfers and HIV/AIDS Prevention: Unconditionally Promising?
    Last registered on May 23, 2016

    Conditional cash transfers (CCTs) have recently received considerable attention as a potentially innovative and effective approach to the prevention of HIV/AIDS. We evaluate a conditional cash transfer program in rural Malawi which offered financial incentives to men and women to maintain their HIV status for approximately one year. The amounts of the reward ranged from zero to approximately 3–4 months wage. We find no effect of the offered incentives on HIV status or on reported sexual behavior. However, shortly after receiving the reward, men who received the cash transfer were 9 percentage points more likely and women were 6.7 percentage points less likely to engage in risky sex. Our analyses therefore question the “unconditional effectiveness” of CCT program for HIV prevention: CCT ...

    View Trial
  • The Demand for Medical Male Circumcision
    Last registered on May 23, 2016

    This paper measures the demand for adult medical male circumcision using an experiment that randomly offered varying-priced subsidies and comprehensive information to 1,600 uncircumcised men in urban Malawi. We find low demand for male circumcision: only 3 percent are circumcised over a three month period. Despite the low overall level of take-up, both price and information are significant determinants of circumcision. Still, the main barriers to male circumcision—cultural norms and fear of pain—are not affected by prices or information. Significant demand generation efforts are needed for this HIV prevention strategy to be effective.

    View Trial
  • Improving Matches between Employers and Job-Seekers in India
    Last registered on May 22, 2016

    Our work aims to understand how labor market frictions affect SME growth in India. Without appropriate information about the pool of job-seekers on the market and their individual quality, firms may end up hiring a poor quality worker, hiring a good worker who is a bad match, or choosing to leave a position vacant altogether. These outcomes are not only costly for firms but also for workers who will face higher rates of unemployment. In this context it becomes important to design policies that can help firms overcome these frictions. The goal of this research is to determine the extent to which the services provided by online job portals can help firms overcome these constraints.

    View Trial
  • Conditional Loans: Flexible Microfinance in Bangladesh
    Last registered on May 22, 2016

    This research proposes to test a new micro-credit product developed in tandem with BRAC Bangladesh that has been modified in order to make it more useful as a income shock coping mechanism. This new product, called the Emergency Loan is designed to address the main limitations of micro-credit as a useful tool for shock coping by offering guaranteed access to a fixed amount of capital regardless of the level of damage done to the individual. It is hoped that thus designed, the Emergency Loan can provide the positive benefits from micro-insurance while by-passing the issue of low demand associated with those products.

    View Trial
</