AEA RCT Registry currently lists 5824 studies with locations in 162 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Effectiveness of conditional cash transfers, subsidized child care, and life skills training on adolescent mothers' school reentry, sexual and reproductive health, and mental health in Malawi and Burkina Faso: The PROMOTE Project randomized control trial
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    We will implement a randomized control trial in Blantyre (Malawi) and Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) to estimate the incremental effect of three interventions aimed at facilitating adolescent mothers’ (re)entry into school or vocation training: a cash transfer conditioned on (re)enrollment into school or vocational training; subsidized childcare; and life skills training offered by community health workers that will cover nurturing childcare, sexual and reproductive health, and financial literacy. We will also examine the effect of the intervention on sexual and reproductive health outcomes and mental health. Adolescent mothers (N=270, per site) will be randomized into one of three study arms. Adolescent mothers in all arms will receive life skills training through adolescent mothers’ c...

  • Information Design To Improve Service Delivery: Experimental Evidence from Guinea-Bissau
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    Poor staff motivation can hinder the delivery of public services. We study how to design information to motivate front-line service providers in a field experiment with Community Health Workers in Guinea-Bissau. Study participants attend a one-day training workshop. We randomly assign half to a module conveying information about program effectiveness which blends scientific evidence with culturally relevant anecdotes. The primary measure of motivation is the performance in a real effort task. This involves phoning households to collect health information and deliver recommendations. We then investigate potential mechanisms via several follow-up surveys. Also, we track participants' performance in their role as CHWs in the months after the workshop. Finally, we follow up with households ...

  • How Group Diversity Affects Newcomer’s and Group’s Cooperation and Coordination
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    We conduct lab experiments to examine how group diversity may affect the integration of newcomers and, as a result, influence the group members’ and the group’s performance in a dynamic environment. We experimentally vary the group compositions and newcomers' social identities and then investigate the impact of the groups' diversity and the newcomers' identities on the groups' and the old and new members' economic decisions, cooperation, and coordination.

  • Social Media Signalling
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    This trial studies social media signalling equilibria by exploring whether social media activity is predictive of offline behaviors. See pre-analysis plan (once available) for full details.

  • A Field Experiment on Tax Avoidance
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    We designed a field experiment to study tax avoidance among households. The subjects in our field experiment are households who pay property taxes and face the opportunity to legally reduce their property taxes via filing a tax appeal. We invite a sample of households' to complete a survey. Within a survey, we conduct an information-provision experiment. We then measure how the information affects their posterior beliefs and the subsequent decision to appeal property taxes (based on administrative records).

  • It’s a small world: effects of overlapping neighborhoods in the provision of public goods
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    This project studies the voluntary provision of a weakest-link public good in overlapping neighborhoods. Located around a virtual table, each individual’s investment decision affects the provision of the public good of herself and her right- and left-hand neighbors. We hypothesize that the introduction of this spatial element can provide obstacles to the level at which the public good is provided and can create a dynamic to the provision level across space. We compare treatments in which the endowments are homogeneous with those where some subjects receive a large, some a low endowment. For this heterogeneous case, we specifically study how the spatial distribution of different income levels affects the investment decisions. We investigate and compare two different mechanisms through wh...

  • The effect of information disclosure on borrowing choices
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    In this study, we estimate the effect of information disclosure on credit card borrowing choices. In an online survey experiment, participants must choose whether they want to borrow on a revolving credit card for consumption. For each hypothetical choice, both the borrowing amount and APR can take one of three possible values. We have three treatments: i) participants are shown the borrowing amount and APR only, ii) in addition, participants are shown the dollar value of the interest they would pay if they do not pay off their credit card debt for one month, or iii) in addition, they are shown the annual interest amount if they do not make any payments on the credit card for one year.

  • "Prosocial behavior: a tale of two images"
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    The aim of this paper is to study the linkages between self and social image. Our framework introduces two new elements. First, players can either (i) strategically choose the criterion based on which they will judge their own actions or (ii) decide to ignore all moral dimensions and pay for blindness. Second, and most importantly, we link self-image to social-image by imposing a coherence principle between the way self-image is calculated and the way other people’s actions are judged: individuals use the same criterion to judge themselves and others. The benefit of this coherence motive can be microfounded by the cost documented in the literature in social psychology of being perceived as a hypocrite, as well as the willingness of people to avoid cognitive dissonance induced by behavin...

  • Gender identity and competition: a virtual reality experiment
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    Gender differences in competitiveness have been studied extensively in experimental economics, and are often put forth as an important contributor to the gender-wage gap. Recent work in psychology uses virtual reality (VR) to embody individuals in bodies with different characteristics, including sex, and reports corresponding changes in the perception of the self. Specifically, embodiment in the body of the opposite sex has recently been shown to lead participants to identify more with the opposite sex and to increase self-attribution of traits stereotypically associated with the opposite sex, including competitiveness (Tacikowski et al., 2020). Evidence on whether these self-reported results on attitudes extend to behavior is lacking. The objective of this project is to test the impact...

  • The impact of gender perceptions on gender discriminatory practices in agricultural extension activities: A field experiment in Kenya
    Last registered on May 16, 2022

    The agricultural sector provides plenty of opportunities to improve female farmers’ livelihoods in sub-Saharan Africa. Still, in many countries, the sector is also characterised by gender biases in various forms and diverse areas, even when men and women farmers share comparable abilities. This study investigates the existing gender (social) norms that inform the construction of gender roles in society, allocating “passive” positions to women farmers. In particular, this study focuses on the influence of these social norms in the context of agricultural extension activities. Social norms ingrained in individual beliefs and preferences can influence how individuals respond to information dependent on the gender of extension agents. Through a field experiment with smallholder farmers in K...