AEA RCT Registry currently lists 773 studies with locations in 95 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • Savings in Transnational Households: A Field Experiment Among Migrants from El Salvador
    Last registered on July 24, 2016

    We implemented a randomized field experiment that tested ways to stimulate savings by international migrants in their origin country. We find that migrants value opportunities to exert greater control over financial activities in their home countries. We offered U.S.-based migrants bank accounts in El Salvador, randomly varying migrant control over El Salvador–based savings by offering different accounts across treatments. Migrants offered the greatest degree of control accumulated the most savings. Impacts likely represent increases in total savings; there is no evidence that savings increases were simply reallocated from other savings mechanisms. Enhanced control over home country savings does not affect remittances sent home.

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  • Building state and citizenry: A randomized evaluation of a tax-collection campaign in the D.R. Congo
    Last registered on July 23, 2016

    The Provincial Government of Kasai Central, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, is conducting its first citywide on-the-ground property and rental tax collection campaign in the provincial capital, Kananga. The primary intervention randomly assigns certain neighborhoods to receive this new door-to-door tax collection program, aided by tablet computers and handheld thermal receipt printers. Control neighborhoods remain in the existing regime, in which citizens are supposed to go to the tax ministry themselves to pay taxes (and as a result, tax payment is very low). This study attempts to measure the impact of the program on citizen beliefs about the government and citizen efforts to hold the government accountable. In other words, the study exploits random variation in taxes paid to exa...

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  • Scoring a goal: How sports may enhance cognitive and non-cognitive abilities of children. An experimental study of football in Lima  - Peru
    Last registered on July 21, 2016

    This study aims to measure the impact of practicing football on a regular basis on the development of young children’s cognitive and non-cognitive skills and other dimensions of well-being. The intervention was implemented by Academia Deportiva Cantolao, a well-known football training school located in Lima, Perú, and was carried out in two training fields located in one of the poorest sector of the city of Lima. Training sessions took place twice per week during weekends, totalizing 15 hours per month of training. The experiment relied on a encouragement design, in which a population of eligible children (those aged 5 to 11 who had not being part of the activities of the school before) was randomly assigned to receive a waiver of the full tuition and activities fees during the period o...

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  • On the mechanics of kleptocratic states: Administrators’ power, protectors, and taxpayers’ false confessions
    Last registered on July 21, 2016

    Powerful state administrators can take advantage of their positions to extract resources, especially when political accountability is broken. We conjecture that administrators’ power depends on their ability to inflict harm using the power of office, their ability to mobilize powerful networks, and on their privileged access to information. Measuring transfers to administrators is challenging, because they often involve secrecy, and surveys often draw on recall. To circumvent this challenge, we develop a smart phone application, and monitor 400 households of the Democratic Republic of the Congo to privately report every day the universe of payments made during 5 months. The DRC offers a well-suited environment, because administrators systematically use their power to extract pay...

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  • Anemia and School Participation
    Last registered on July 21, 2016

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among assisted children, and preschool-participation rates rose by 5.8 percentage points, reducing absenteeism by one-fifth. Gains were especially pronounced for those most likely to be anemic at baseline. Results contribute to a growing view that school-based health programs are an effective way of promoting school attendance in less developed countries.

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  • Under-investment in a Profitable Technology: The Case of Seasonal Migration in Bangladesh
    Last registered on July 21, 2016

    Hunger during pre-harvest lean seasons is widespread in the agrarian areas of Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. We randomly assign an $8.50 incentive to households in rural Bangladesh to temporarily out-migrate during the lean season. The incentive induces 22% of households to send a seasonal migrant, their consumption at the origin increases significantly, and treated households are 8–10 percentage points more likely to re-migrate 1 and 3 years after the incentive is removed. These facts can be explained qualitatively by a model in which migration is risky, mitigating risk requires individual-specific learning, and some migrants are sufficiently close to subsistence that failed migration is very costly. We document evidence consistent with this model using heterogeneity analysis and additio...

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  • The Role of Information in Agricultural Technology Adoption: Experimental Evidence from Rice Farmers in Uganda
    Last registered on July 21, 2016

    Previous research identified information inefficiencies as a major constraint to sustainable crop intensification among rice farmers in Eastern Uganda. The fact that some farmers report not using certain inputs or techniques because they are not aware of them while others report they are aware of them but are not using them suggests information gaps at two levels. First, farmers may lack knowledge about the existence or use a particular input or technology. Second, a farmer may not be aware of the returns to using the technology. In this study we therefore try out two different information treatments at the individual level. In a first intervention, we show farmers the recommend practices and inputs in rice farming. In a second intervention, we point out the returns to investment in a s...

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  • Who Chooses to Sell to the Government? Screening and Barriers to Entry in Brazilian Public Procurement
    Last registered on July 20, 2016

    We will study the effects of lowering transaction costs to participating in public procurement on the number and types of firms that compete in the procurement auctions, the types of firms who win contracts and the value-for-money of government purchases. We will focus on procurement reforms introduced by the state of Amazonas and its capital city, Manaus. Both governments are taking actions to reduce the excess of bureaucracy and foster competition in procurement processes. In collaboration with these governments, we will introduce random variation in the implementation of these reforms to learn how different components of the reforms can affect the selection of suppliers and the cost-effectiveness of public procurement. Within Brazil, governments utilize a variety of different proc...

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  • Do Robotic Calls from Credible Sources Influence Voter Turnout or Vote Choice?
    Last registered on July 20, 2016

    The effectiveness of prerecorded phone calls was assessed in the context of a Texas Republican primary election that featured a contest for state Supreme Court. Automated calls endorsing one of the judicial candidates were recorded by the sitting Republican governor and directed at more than a quarter million people identified as likely voters and probably supporters of the governor. Two experimental designs were used to evaluate the calls' effectiveness. The first design randomly assigned households to treatment and control conditions in order to gauge the calls' effects on individuals' voter turnout, as measured by public records. The second design randomly assigned precincts to treatment and control conditions in order to assess whether the calls increased the precinct-level vote mar...

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  • The Effect of a Nonpartisan Get-Out-the-Vote Drive in the United States
    Last registered on July 20, 2016

    A field experiment assessed the effects of a nonpartisan voter mobilization drive. On the weekend before the 1998 general election, voters in the treatment group received an 8" x 11" card on which was printed a nonpartisan encouragement to vote. This treatment had no effect on the turnout rates of registered Republicans and Democrats, but it increased the turnout of those voters unaffiliated with a major party. We find that the treatment was particularly effective at increasing voting among those unaffiliated voters who voted in 1996.

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