AEA RCT Registry currently lists 1548 studies with locations in 115 countries.

Most Recently Registered Trials

  • No Lean Season 2017 Evaluation
    Last registered on January 19, 2018

    This is a randomized trial evaluating a seasonal migration incentivization program, No Lean Season, implemented in partnership by Evidence Action and RDRS. The program aims to mitigate seasonal hardship in rural agricultural areas but providing loans to rural laborer, incentivizing them to seek temporary employment in nearby cities. The evaluation aims to (a) update findings from previous research studies, and in particular, to investigate whether the program's positive impact will be replicable at scale; and (b) investigate the program’s spillover effects on workers at the migration destination who are not offered migration incentives. Welfare outcomes (expenditure, caloric intake, income, and food security) will be measured in a manner consistent with previous evaluations of this prog...

  • The Impact of LinkedIn on Disconnected Young Work-Seekers: Evidence from South Africa
    Last registered on January 19, 2018

    This document outlines a plan for a labor market intervention being conducted in several cities across South Africa in cooperation with the Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator. Randomly altering the curriculum of Harambee's corporate work readiness training program to include a LinkedIn (the digital professional networking site) component will allow researchers to estimate the effect of the LinkedIn "treatment" on the long-run employment outcomes, professional networks, educational investments, and career expectations and aspirations of young work-seekers in South Africa.

  • The Effects of Child Care Subsidies on Women’s Economic Opportunities in the Slums of Nairobi
    Last registered on January 18, 2018

    In urban informal settlement areas of Nairobi (Kenya), as throughout sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), women’s ability to achieve economic autonomy is often curtailed by their concurrent responsibility to care for young children. In this paper, we present our pre-analysis plan of our randomized experiment to assess the effects of subsidized and improved quality daycare on women’s engagement with the labor force in an informal settlement area of Nairobi. Approximately 1,200 mothers with children aged 1 to 3 will be enrolled in our study. One third of these women will be randomly assigned to receive vouchers for a full year of free child care at local daycare facilities. Another third will be given similar vouchers at daycare facilities where child care providers will receive enhanced early chi...

  • Nudging taxpayers to pay taxes on time: Evidence from a field experiment
    Last registered on January 18, 2018

    This study evaluates how nudges affect tax compliance behavior. We alter standard remainder letters with messages affected by behavioral science to see how they affect the willingness of paying taxes on time. We use administrative data from more than 150 000 individuals in Finland to conduct our experiment.

  • Public Recognition and Long Run Employee Performance
    Last registered on January 18, 2018

    I design a field experiment where for a sample of roughly 850 teachers employed in 39 schools, I study how repeated public recognition impacts their short and long run performance. In each school I define the top performing employees based on teacher value added to the student grades, since the beginning of the first semester. After 4 months of recording performance, in a randomly selected half of the schools, the top performing employees are publicly praised in an on-line message posted on the school messaging board. The message is observed by staff, students and parents. Following the first round of intervention, I continue collecting data on changes in teacher performance throughout the remaining academic year and repeat the intervention at regular intervals. After the end of the aca...

  • Parental Engagement for Smoking Prevention among Schoolchildren in Indonesia
    Last registered on January 18, 2018

    We seek to provide information to change social norms in schools by using social comparisons to increase parental involvement to motivate students to abstain from smoking.

  • Parental income pooling on educational expenses: Evidence from Tanzania
    Last registered on January 18, 2018

    In developing countries women’s avoidance of bargaining with their spouse about the allocation of household resources has been suggested as a source of inefficiency. In particular, women seem to shield resources for educational investment for children from their husbands. Using a lab-in-the-field experiment this project studies whether parental preference heterogeneity and female empowerment in the household cause such behavior consistent with a non-cooperative model. Besides a direct cost, shielding resources from the spouse implies an efficiency cost from the lack of income pooling, which, in developing countries, allows access to indivisible investment goods and insures certain expenses against income shocks. In the study I am able to vary and measure efficiency losses directly. In t...

  • The impact of high-frequency survey participation on job take-up
    Last registered on January 17, 2018

    We want to investigate whether the participation in a app-based panel survey affects job seekers' duration of unemployment. Participants of a high-frequency panel survey on job seekers' well-being serve as control group. A randomly chosen subsample of job seekers who agreed to participate in the survey too are excluded from the survey to build the control group. The survey data are merged with Information about employment status from administrative records. Members of both groups must approve of the linkage of their survey data with the administrative information.

  • Gender matters - Performance spillover effects of symbolic recognition at school
    Last registered on January 17, 2018

    Symbolic recognition can be an efficient and powerful tool for motivating people. Despite much research on ex ante announced symbolic incentives, little is known about the spillover effect of different recognition types in a multitask setting. In this laboratory experiment we examine not only positive but also negative symbolic recognition and its spillover effects. Secondary school students work on two different tasks. In the experimental treatment, students receive unannounced symbolic performance feedback for the first task. We are interested in gender differences for the spillover effect of recognition on performance in the second task. This experiment is a follow-up study designed to collect more data as suggested by two referees. Experimental design and procedures are the same as...

  • Promoting Adolescent Engagement, Knowledge and Health Evaluation of PAnKH: an adolescent girl intervention in Rajasthan, India
    Last registered on January 17, 2018

    Adolescence is increasingly recognised as a crucial life stage from both a social and developmental perspective. Decisions made during adolescence – from dropping out from school, to getting married early, to engaging in risky behaviours – can have lifelong implications. At the same time, this is an important period of neurobiological development, particularly of socio-emotional and non-cognitive skills. In all, these two factors make adolescence a period of heightened vulnerability to adverse environmental factors but also opportunity for intervention. Adolescent girls in rural India face particular pressures: poverty, highly conservative gender norms and customs around women’s marriage, education and role within the household combine to put girls at exceptionally high risk of child ...