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Water Treatement Promotion at Health Clinics in Kenya
Last registered on March 08, 2016

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Water Treatement Promotion at Health Clinics in Kenya
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0001076
Initial registration date
March 08, 2016
Last updated
March 08, 2016 5:22 PM EST
Location(s)
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Stanford University
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
Global Innovation Fund
PI Affiliation
Harvard University
PI Affiliation
IFPRI
Additional Trial Information
Status
Completed
Start date
2007-11-12
End date
2010-08-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Free provision of preventive health products in the developing world can dramatically increase access. A concern about free provision is that people who take health products for free may not use them, with associated wasted resources. This trial compares take-up and usage of point of use water treatment solution under alternative free distribution mechanisms against cost-sharing.

External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Dupas, Pascaline et al. 2016. "Water Treatement Promotion at Health Clinics in Kenya." AEA RCT Registry. March 08. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.1076-1.0.
Former Citation
Dupas, Pascaline et al. 2016. "Water Treatement Promotion at Health Clinics in Kenya." AEA RCT Registry. March 08. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/1076/history/7196.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
Caregivers of children aged 6-12 months were recruited at four rural maternal and child health clinics, and randomly assigned to one of five treatment groups:

1) COST SHARING treatment: Water treatment solution was made available for immediate purchase at a 50% discount off the retail price. Participants could purchase up to five 150 mL bottles of the solution (enough to last approximately five to eight months), at 10 Kenyan Shillings (Ksh) per bottle.
2) VOUCHERS treatment: Twelve vouchers, each redeemable for one 150 mL bottle of water treatment solution at either a local shop or the clinic itself were provided. Each voucher was marked for a specific month, for the next 12 consecutive months, and participants were given a calendar to track the expiration of vouchers.
3) FREE DELIVERY treatment: Two 500 ml bottles of water treatment solution were provided, one immediately and the second during the follow-up survey, three to five months later. At the time they received the first bottle, participants were informed they would receive a second bottle later. This supply of 1,000 ml of water treatment solution was expected to last approximately 7 to 11 months.
4) FREE SAMPLE treatment: a single 150 mL bottle of water treatment solution was given at the time of enrollment.
5) BABY BOTTLE treatment: a single 150 mL bottle of water treatment solution, a sippy cup, and dropper that could be used to dose water in the sippy cup, were given at the time of enrollment.
Intervention Start Date
2007-11-12
Intervention End Date
2008-11-09
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Take up of water treatment solution; usage of water treatment solution as measured by verified chlorine residual in drinking water container during unannounced visit
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
Respondents were visited at their homes 3-5 months after enrollment, and again at 2 years after enrollment. Stored drinking water was tested for residual chlorine at both visits.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
Sealed envelopes containing treatment codes were opened at the end of the baseline interview.
Randomization Unit
Individual
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
n/a
Sample size: planned number of observations
1,979
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
COST SHARING: 351
VOUCHERS: 382
FREE DELIVERY: 385
FREE SAMPLE: 442
BABY BOTTLE: 412
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
Supporting Documents and Materials

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Request Information
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Institutional Review Board of IPA Kenya
IRB Approval Date
2007-11-01
IRB Approval Number
n/a
IRB Name
UC Berkeley Committee for Protection of Human Subjects
IRB Approval Date
2007-10-17
IRB Approval Number
2007-5-72
IRB Name
Kemri/National Ethics Review Committee
IRB Approval Date
2010-03-30
IRB Approval Number
n/a
Post-Trial
Post Trial Information
Study Withdrawal
Intervention
Is the intervention completed?
No
Is data collection complete?
Data Publication
Data Publication
Is public data available?
No
Program Files
Program Files
Reports and Papers
Preliminary Reports
Relevant Papers