Farm & Family Balance Study: the intra-household and gender dynamics of cash-cropping

Last registered on June 05, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information

General Information

Title
Farm & Family Balance Study: the intra-household and gender dynamics of cash-cropping
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0001647
Initial registration date
October 04, 2016

Initial registration date is when the trial was registered.

It corresponds to when the registration was submitted to the Registry to be reviewed for publication.

First published
October 04, 2016, 11:20 AM EDT

First published corresponds to when the trial was first made public on the Registry after being reviewed.

Last updated
June 05, 2019, 11:44 AM EDT

Last updated is the most recent time when changes to the trial's registration were published.

Locations

Region

Primary Investigator

Affiliation
American University

Other Primary Investigator(s)

PI Affiliation
World Bank Gender Innovation Lab
PI Affiliation
IFPRI

Additional Trial Information

Status
Completed
Start date
2016-07-25
End date
2018-10-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
While commercialization of agriculture has the potential to benefit small-scale producers, the transition to cash cropping does not always improve welfare. Shifts in intra-household allocation arising from this transition may be one explanation. While women often participate in cash crop production, in this context it is almost exclusively men who are responsible for sales and profit allocation. In this study we undertake two interventions to increase women’s participation in cash crop production and management and their access to profits. Can increasing women’s economic empowerment in this way change outcomes at the household level? Random assignment of households into treatment and control groups will allow for a rigorous estimation of the interventions’ impacts. Outcomes of interest include women’s bargaining power within the home, crop management and production, fulfillment of production contracts, the intra-household allocation of profits, household food security, and child welfare.
External Link(s)

Registration Citation

Citation
Ambler, Kate, Kelly Jones and Michael O'Sullivan. 2019. "Farm & Family Balance Study: the intra-household and gender dynamics of cash-cropping ." AEA RCT Registry. June 05. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.1647
Former Citation
Ambler, Kate, Kelly Jones and Michael O'Sullivan. 2019. "Farm & Family Balance Study: the intra-household and gender dynamics of cash-cropping ." AEA RCT Registry. June 05. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/1647/history/47583
Experimental Details

Interventions

Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2016-10-31
Intervention End Date
2017-04-30

Primary Outcomes

Primary Outcomes (end points)
Outcomes of interest include women’s bargaining power within the home, crop management and production, fulfillment of production contracts, the intra-household allocation of profits, household food security, and child welfare.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)

Secondary Outcomes

Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)

Experimental Design

Experimental Design
Half of the households enrolled in the study will be randomly assigned to be invited to a couples-based participatory training that focuses on recognizing contributions of each member and arriving at a balanced approach to household (or farm) management and access to resources. The training will be based on the Gender Action Learning System (GALS) methodology developed by Oxfam Novib in Uganda and executed by experienced, local GALS trainers. The goal of the workshop intervention is two-fold. First, it may have a large impact on its own, by altering the way in which spouses communicate and organize their households to become more inclusive and, in particular, involve women in sugarcane production. Although relative bargaining power should not be directly affected by the workshop, it may affect the bargaining process itself. Additionally, the training may act to lower informational barriers within the household, thereby directly affecting household choices. Second, the training is expected to encourage take-up of the contract intervention.

Within each workshop assignment arm (treatment and control), half of households will be assigned to receive a contract intervention. The contract intervention will entail household visits by specially-trained staff to remind/inform each farmer that he is allowed to transfer one or more of his contracts into the name of his wife at any time. Farmers can also register in the wife’s name any unregistered blocks. This would entitle the wife to inputs, cash advances, and the final payment. The project will facilitate the paperwork to make these transfers easy and pay the small costs associated with these transfers. The project will additionally offer an in-kind “household gift” incentive of approximately $30 in value to households who take-up the contract intervention. Given the important nature of the contract transfer decision, project staff will make up to three visits to selected households to complete the transfer process to give families the time they desire to make the decision of whether or not to participate.

This intervention acts to increase relative bargaining power among women to whom contracts are transferred, thereby resulting in production and consumption decisions that more closely mirror her preferences. By bringing women into an area of household activity in which they previously had little to no role, information asymmetries may also be reduced, causing less income to be hidden and diverted from consumption and investment decisions that are mutually agreed upon as part of the household bargaining process.

Based on the results of the pilot, we expect take-up of the workshop intervention to be 98% and we expect take-up of the contract intervention to be about 65% among those not invited to workshops and 95% among those who were invited to workshops.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
Randomization by computer
Randomization Unit
Household
Was the treatment clustered?
No

Experiment Characteristics

Sample size: planned number of clusters
400 villages
Sample size: planned number of observations
2,400 households
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
600 households per arm (4 arms in a 2x2 design)
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs)

IRB Name
Uganda National Council for Science and Technology
IRB Approval Date
2016-07-20
IRB Approval Number
A531
IRB Name
International Health Sciences University (Uganda)
IRB Approval Date
2016-06-28
IRB Approval Number
22
IRB Name
International Food Policy Research Institute
IRB Approval Date
2016-03-17
IRB Approval Number
7490
Analysis Plan

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Post-Trial

Post Trial Information

Study Withdrawal

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Intervention

Is the intervention completed?
No
Data Collection Complete
Data Publication

Data Publication

Is public data available?
No

Program Files

Program Files
Reports, Papers & Other Materials

Relevant Paper(s)

Reports & Other Materials