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Intertemporal Substitution and the Value of Work Hours Flexibility
Last registered on October 17, 2017

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Intertemporal Substitution and the Value of Work Hours Flexibility
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0001656
Initial registration date
October 06, 2016
Last updated
October 17, 2017 12:10 PM EDT
Location(s)
Region
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
MIT
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
Uber Technologies, Inc.
PI Affiliation
MIT
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2016-08-22
End date
2017-11-10
Secondary IDs
Abstract
We use a field experiment to estimate rideshare drivers’ intertemporal substitution elasticities and their willingness to pay for work arrangements. The experiment offers a subset of rideshare drivers the opportunity to drive under alternative wage schemes which offer higher wages for some choices of hours. We then study opt-in behavior and labor supply decisions. Our research plan includes subgroup analyses for drivers defined by driving histories, different platform participation histories, vehicle model age, and sex.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Angrist, Joshua, Sydnee Caldwell and Jonathan Hall. 2017. "Intertemporal Substitution and the Value of Work Hours Flexibility." AEA RCT Registry. October 17. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/1656/history/22402
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2016-08-22
Intervention End Date
2017-11-10
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
We use a field experiment to estimate rideshare drivers’ intertemporal substitution elasticities and their willingness to pay for work arrangements. The experiment offers a subset of rideshare drivers the opportunity to drive under alternative wage schemes which offer higher wages for some choices of hours. We then study opt-in behavior and labor supply decisions. Our research plan includes subgroup analyses for drivers defined by driving histories, different platform participation histories, vehicle model age, and sex.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
The experiment is designed to estimate the value of work hours flexibility for workers in the gig economy. We first selected a subset of rideshare drivers to be included in our experiment. We contacted these drivers with an initial offer, which was unambiguously attractive to all drivers. Drivers who did not choose to participate in this treatment were not contacted again. A subset of drivers who chose to opt in were contacted again with opportunities to drive under alternative wage schemes. We collected data on driving behavior and opt-in choices.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
randomization done in office by a computer
Randomization Unit
driver
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
5000 drivers
Sample size: planned number of observations
5000 drivers
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
2500 treatment, 2500 control
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
MIT Committee on the Use of Humans as Experimental Subjects
IRB Approval Date
2016-05-19
IRB Approval Number
1605555831
Post-Trial
Post Trial Information
Study Withdrawal
Intervention
Is the intervention completed?
No
Is data collection complete?
Data Publication
Data Publication
Is public data available?
No
Program Files
Program Files
Reports and Papers
Preliminary Reports
Relevant Papers