Islamophobia, Legitimacy and Social Desirability: MTurk Online Survey
Last registered on February 06, 2017

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Islamophobia, Legitimacy and Social Desirability: MTurk Online Survey
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0001994
Initial registration date
February 05, 2017
Last updated
February 06, 2017 12:46 PM EST
Location(s)
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
University of California, San Diego
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
University of Chicago
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2017-01-01
End date
2017-03-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
We will recruit survey participants on MTurk to conduct an online survey. With this survey, we plan to study whether the legitimacy (in the sense of conformity to the law) of a certain political view also affects its social desirability.
First, all subjects will answer a few demographic questions. Second, they will be randomized into three groups. Subjects in the control group will receive no information. Subjects in the "popular" treatment group will be told that a large proportion of survey respondents support an anti-Muslim policy. Subjects in the "unconstitutional" treatment group will also be told that this anti-Muslim policy is unconstitutional. Third, we will measure their beliefs about the popularity of the anti-Muslim policy. Given the tone of the current political discourse, the "popular" treatment might not change our subjects' beliefs about the popularity of the anti-Muslim policy. However, it is important to test that these beliefs are not affected by the "unconstitutional treatment". Fourth, we will measure subjects willingness to donate money to an anti-Muslim organization promoting the policy. In particular, we will offer them a $1 compensation if they agree on allowing us to donate $1 to the anti-Muslim organization of their behalf. Customers will be randomized into two groups: in one group we will emphasize that their decision is private; in the other group we will tell subjects that "a member of the research team might personally contact you to verify your answers", thus making the decision to be perceived as public. We will test our hypothesis by comparing the donation decisions of subjects in the six (3x2) experimental groups. Again, given the election results our subjects might already believe that a vast proportion of citizens support anti-Muslim policies. If this is the case, there might not exist a wedge between public and private donation rates in the control group which the "popular" treatment could reduce. Since what we are particularly interested in is whether the "unconstitutional" treatment increase the wedge by diminishing the perceived social desirability of supporting anti-Muslim policies, it is still important to have the "popular" treatment group to control for the effect of popular support.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Bursztyn, Leonardo and Stefano Fiorin. 2017. "Islamophobia, Legitimacy and Social Desirability: MTurk Online Survey." AEA RCT Registry. February 06. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.1994-3.0.
Former Citation
Bursztyn, Leonardo, Stefano Fiorin and Stefano Fiorin. 2017. "Islamophobia, Legitimacy and Social Desirability: MTurk Online Survey." AEA RCT Registry. February 06. http://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/1994/history/13783.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2017-02-06
Intervention End Date
2017-02-28
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Beliefs about the popularity of anti-Muslim policies. Donation decisions.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Beliefs about the popularity of anti-Muslim policies are the answer to the following question. .

"Out of 100 people, how many do you think would say in an anonymous survey that they think Muslims should be prohibited from holding public office?”

Donation decisions are the answer to the following question.

"ACT for America is the largest grassroots anti-Muslim organization in the U.S actively working to promote anti-Muslim legislation and opinion. The founder of ACT for America is Brigitte Gabriel, the author of a book titled “They Must Be Stopped” and who argued that Muslims should be prohibited from holding public office because “a practicing Muslim, who believes in the teachings of the Koran, cannot be a loyal citizen of the United States.” ACT for America believes that Muslims represent a threat to both national security and American values; its Thin Blue Line project comprehensively mapped the addresses of U.S. Muslim student associations and other Islamic institutions as sites of national security concern.

Would you like to have us donate $1 on your behalf to ACT for America?

If you decide to have $1 donated to the anti-Muslim organization ACT for America, we will also transfer $1 extra to your MTurk account. So, if you decide to donate, instead of $0.50, you will be paid $1.50 in total. If instead you prefer not to donate, you will only be paid $0.50 for completing the survey.

So would you like to have us donate $1 on your behalf to ACT for America?"
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
We will recruit survey participants on MTurk to conduct an online survey.
First, all subjects will answer a few demographic questions. Second, they will be randomized into three groups. Subjects in the control group will receive no information. Subjects in the "popular" treatment group will be told that a large proportion of survey respondents support an anti-Muslim policy. Subjects in the "unconstitutional" treatment group will also be told that this anti-Muslim policy is unconstitutional. Third, we will measure their beliefs about the popularity of the anti-Muslim policy. Fourth, we will measure subjects willingness to donate money to an anti-Muslim organization promoting the policy. Customers will be randomized into two groups: in one group we will emphasize that their decision is private; in the other group we will tell subjects that "a member of the research team might personally contact you to verify your answers", thus making the decision to be perceived as public. We will test our hypothesis by comparing the donation decisions of subjects in the six (3x2) experimental groups.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
The randomization will be done on Qualtrics, a website for conducting online surveys.
Randomization Unit
The unit of randomization will be the individual subject.
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
N/A
Sample size: planned number of observations
600 individuals
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
100 control group private, 100 control group public, 100 popular support private, 100 popular support public, 100 unconstitutional private, 100 unconstitutional public.
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
N/A
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
UCLA IRB
IRB Approval Date
2017-02-05
IRB Approval Number
IRB#16-001667
Post-Trial
Post Trial Information
Study Withdrawal
Intervention
Is the intervention completed?
No
Is data collection complete?
Data Publication
Data Publication
Is public data available?
No
Program Files
Program Files
Reports and Papers
Preliminary Reports
Relevant Papers