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The Mechanism, Extent and Effects of Fiscal Illusion Among UK Taxpayers
Last registered on April 09, 2018

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
The Mechanism, Extent and Effects of Fiscal Illusion Among UK Taxpayers
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0002796
Initial registration date
March 20, 2018
Last updated
April 09, 2018 6:56 AM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
King's College London
Other Primary Investigator(s)
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2018-03-20
End date
2019-12-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Fiscal illusion theory suggests that taxpayers may be unaware of their taxes and how their taxes are spent. Empirical research on the hypotheses of fiscal illusion has been inconclusive, while taxpayers’ perception studies have reported widespread tax misperception, with both over and underestimation of taxes observed.

Proposed web survey-based experiment seeks to investigate the mechanism of fiscal illusion, collect data on UK taxpayers tax attitudes and perception, and examine how the provision of tax and public spending information these attitudes and preferences.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Leontjeva-Numaviciene, Kaetana. 2018. "The Mechanism, Extent and Effects of Fiscal Illusion Among UK Taxpayers." AEA RCT Registry. April 09. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.2796-2.0.
Former Citation
Leontjeva-Numaviciene, Kaetana. 2018. "The Mechanism, Extent and Effects of Fiscal Illusion Among UK Taxpayers." AEA RCT Registry. April 09. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/2796/history/27781.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2018-03-27
Intervention End Date
2019-12-31
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
The primary outcomes are respondents' responses to survey questions on their fiscal policy attitudes and preferences.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Alienation
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Alienation is constructed from a response to a question 'Does voting in the General Election make a difference?', with respondents answering 'No' considered to experience feelings of alienation.
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
The experiment will consist of two groups, a control and a treatment group. The control group will be asked to answer questions on their fiscal policy attitudes and preferences. The treatment group with be presented with information on taxes and public spending in the UK, and would then be asked to answer identical questions.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
The company collecting data, Survey Sampling Internation, LLC, employs a multi-stage randomization process involving random selection of participants from SSI's panel invited to take part in a survey, and randomized allocation to a particular survey.
Randomization Unit
Individual
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
4,000 employees
Sample size: planned number of observations
4,000 employees
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
2,000 employees in the treatment group, 2,000 employees in the control group
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
Supporting Documents and Materials

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IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
King's College London, Research Ethics Office, Law Research Ethics Panel
IRB Approval Date
2017-09-08
IRB Approval Number
LRS-16/17-4668
Analysis Plan

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