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Trial
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Last Published March 29, 2018 06:35 PM April 01, 2018 12:40 PM
Primary Outcomes (End Points) Our core short-run outcomes are housing mobility and neighborhood environment characteristics. These include • Initial lease up rate in an opportunity area (Defined at the family-level as 1 = lease up in opportunity neighborhood; 0 = does not lease up in opportunity neighborhood) • Exposure to higher opportunity neighborhood quality. Our primary measure of this will be exposure-weighted mean neighborhood quality for the two years after random assignment using the Chetty and Hendren (2018 QJE) mean upward mobility rate of each neighborhood (Census tract). We will consider alternative ways to measure the exposure to neighborhood quality, including i. Share of post-random assignment period spent residing in a high opportunity neighborhood (using a discrete measure of high opportunity) ii. Point-in-time measures include measuring opportunity neighborhood residency status (binary or continuous measure using tract-level upward mobility rate) at a given amount of time after random assignment. For example, initial outcomes may be measured as the likelihood each family is living in an opportunity neighborhood one year after being randomly assigned to treatment or control groups. Our core short-run outcomes are housing mobility and neighborhood environment characteristics. These include • Initial lease up rate in an opportunity area (Defined at the family-level as 1 = lease up in opportunity neighborhood; 0 = does not lease up in opportunity neighborhood) • Exposure to higher opportunity neighborhood quality. Our primary measure of this will be exposure-weighted mean neighborhood quality for the two years after random assignment using the Chetty and Hendren (2018 QJE) mean upward mobility rate of each neighborhood (Census tract). We will consider alternative ways to measure the exposure to neighborhood quality, including i. Share of post-random assignment period spent residing in a high opportunity neighborhood (using a discrete measure of high opportunity) ii. Point-in-time measures include measuring opportunity neighborhood residency status (binary or continuous measure using tract-level upward mobility rate) at a given amount of time after random assignment. For example, initial outcomes may be measured as the likelihood each family is living in an opportunity neighborhood one year after being randomly assigned to treatment or control groups.
Secondary Outcomes (End Points) A secondary short-run outcome is the housing choice voucher lease up rate (1 = lease up with the housing choice voucher; 0 = does not lease up). Interim secondary outcomes on families include • Children’s standardized test scores (state percentile rank) • Household adults’ employment and earnings Longer-run child outcomes include • Post-random assignment childhood exposure-weighted neighborhood quality from random assignment to age 18 (or early 20s) based on the Chetty and Hendren (2018 QJE) measure of neighborhood (Census tract) upward mobility. This is the primary measure of neighborhood environment that the intervention is designed to support. • Core outcomes from IRS administrative tax data as defined in Chetty, Hendren, and Katz (2016 AER, Table 11) include i. Individual earnings ii. Household income iii. College attendance from age 18-20 (%) iv. College quality from age 18-20 v. Marital status vi. Poverty share in zip code of residence (%) (or in Census tract of residence if possible with future versions of administrative tax data) References: Chetty, Raj and Nathaniel Hendren. 2018. “The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility I: Childhood Exposure Effects.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 133(3), forthcoming. Chetty, Raj and Nathaniel Hendren. 2018. “The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility II: County-Level Estimates.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 133(3), forthcoming. Chetty, Raj, Nathaniel Hendren, and Lawrence F. Katz. 2016. "The Effects of Exposure to Better Neighborhoods on Children: New Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment." American Economic Review, 106(4): 855-902. A secondary short-run outcome is the housing choice voucher lease up rate (1 = lease up with the housing choice voucher; 0 = does not lease up). Interim secondary outcomes on families include • Children’s standardized test scores (state percentile rank) • Household adults’ employment and earnings Longer-run child outcomes include • Post-random assignment childhood exposure-weighted neighborhood quality from random assignment to age 18 (or early 20s) based on the Chetty and Hendren (2018 QJE) measure of neighborhood (Census tract) upward mobility. This is the primary measure of neighborhood environment that the intervention is designed to support. • Core outcomes from IRS administrative tax data as defined in Chetty, Hendren, and Katz (2016 AER, Table 11) include i. Individual earnings ii. Household income iii. College attendance from age 18-20 (%) iv. College quality from age 18-20 v. Marital status vi. Poverty share in zip code of residence (%) (or in Census tract of residence if possible with future versions of administrative tax data) References: Chetty, Raj and Nathaniel Hendren. 2018. “The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility I: Childhood Exposure Effects.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 133(3), forthcoming. Chetty, Raj and Nathaniel Hendren. 2018. “The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility II: County-Level Estimates.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 133(3), forthcoming. Chetty, Raj, Nathaniel Hendren, and Lawrence F. Katz. 2016. "The Effects of Exposure to Better Neighborhoods on Children: New Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment." American Economic Review, 106(4): 855-902.
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