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Reducing Parent-Child Information Frictions
Last registered on February 22, 2014

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Reducing Parent-Child Information Frictions
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0000286
Initial registration date
February 21, 2014
Last updated
February 22, 2014 12:11 PM EST
Location(s)
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Columbia University Teachers College
Other Primary Investigator(s)
Additional Trial Information
Status
Completed
Start date
2010-11-10
End date
2011-07-25
Secondary IDs
Abstract
This study uses a field experiment to answer how information problems between parents and their children affect education outcomes and whether a cost-effective intervention can ameliorate these problems to improve student achievement. In Los Angeles, a random sample of parents was provided detailed information about their child's academic progress. Teachers were also asked to predict students that would benefit most from this intervention.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
BERGMAN, PETER. 2014. "Reducing Parent-Child Information Frictions ." AEA RCT Registry. February 22. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.286-2.0.
Former Citation
BERGMAN, PETER. 2014. "Reducing Parent-Child Information Frictions ." AEA RCT Registry. February 22. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/286/history/1107.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
To measure the causal effect of reducing parent-child information frictions on human capital investments and achievement students' parents or guardians were randomly selected to receive additional information about their child's academic progress. This information consisted of emails, text messages and phone calls listing students' missing assignments and grades several times a month over the school year.
Intervention Start Date
2010-12-10
Intervention End Date
2011-06-25
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Student work habits, GPA, test scores and parent behaviors.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
Out of all 462 students in grades six through eleven at a single school, 242 students' parents or guardians were randomly selected to receive additional information about their child's academic progress.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
Done in office by a computer
Randomization Unit
Student level
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
0
Sample size: planned number of observations
462
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
242 treatment 220 control.
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
UCLA Human Subjects Review Board
IRB Approval Date
2010-08-30
IRB Approval Number
10-001046
Post-Trial
Post Trial Information
Study Withdrawal
Intervention
Is the intervention completed?
Yes
Intervention Completion Date
June 25, 2011, 12:00 AM +00:00
Is data collection complete?
Yes
Data Collection Completion Date
July 25, 2011, 12:00 AM +00:00
Final Sample Size: Number of Clusters (Unit of Randomization)
0
Was attrition correlated with treatment status?
No
Final Sample Size: Total Number of Observations
279
Final Sample Size (or Number of Clusters) by Treatment Arms
Data Publication
Data Publication
Is public data available?
No
Program Files
Program Files
Reports and Papers
Preliminary Reports
Relevant Papers