VOTING WITH YOUR DOLLAR: DOES CONSUMER CHOICE ACT AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR POLITICAL EXPRESSION
Last registered on May 14, 2018

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
VOTING WITH YOUR DOLLAR: DOES CONSUMER CHOICE ACT AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR POLITICAL EXPRESSION
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0002978
Initial registration date
May 10, 2018
Last updated
May 14, 2018 6:11 PM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Skidmore College
Other Primary Investigator(s)
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2018-05-10
End date
2019-05-10
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Sustainability advocates often state that it is important for individuals to vote with their dollars, meaning that they should purchase products that reflect their beliefs and values. However, we know from moral balancing theory that sometimes one pro-social behavior can crowd out the motivation to engage in a subsequent behavior. If this is true also for political expression, can voting with one’s dollar cause decreases in other types of political expression? This study is the first stage of a set of experiments that seek to determine whether voting with your dollar and other forms of political expression are substitutes, complements, or unrelated. Through randomization of question ordering in an online survey, we examine whether answering questions about political consumerism behaviors affects a person's stated likelihood of engaging in a set of political behaviors ranging from voting to contacting an elected representative.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Goff, Sandra. 2018. "VOTING WITH YOUR DOLLAR: DOES CONSUMER CHOICE ACT AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR POLITICAL EXPRESSION." AEA RCT Registry. May 14. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/2978/history/29471
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
Using an online survey we use randomized question ordering to determine if reminders of one's political consumerism behaviors will affect stated propensity to engage in other types of political behavior.
Intervention Start Date
2018-05-10
Intervention End Date
2018-05-24
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
boycott behavior, ethical consumerism behavior, writing to representative, voting, participating in march/protest
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
Using an online survey we use randomized question ordering to determine if reminders of one's political consumerism behaviors will affect stated propensity to engage in other types of political behavior. 450 participants are randomly assigned to receive either the set of political consumerism questions first or the set of political action questions first. We test for significant differences in the outcome variables between these two groups.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomized via survey software
Randomization Unit
Individual
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
NA
Sample size: planned number of observations
450
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
approximately 225 political consumerism first, approximately 225 political behaviors first
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Skidmore IRB
IRB Approval Date
2018-05-04
IRB Approval Number
1805-724