x

Please fill out this short user survey of only 3 questions in order to help us improve the site. We appreciate your feedback!
Do team-based input incentives boost skill development? Evidence from India
Last registered on December 10, 2018

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Do team-based input incentives boost skill development? Evidence from India
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0003645
Initial registration date
December 06, 2018
Last updated
December 10, 2018 2:04 PM EST
Location(s)
Region
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
Indian School of Business
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2017-09-01
End date
2019-09-01
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Skill development programs are sub-optimally effective because participants do not attend frequently enough, or because they drop out of the program before completion. Especially while learning skills with non-linear rewards to attendance, such as English language and soft skills, motivating students to attend more frequently, and to stick with the program till completion might yield significantly better outcomes.

Drawing on the case of a one year English and non-cognitive skills development program in India, we analyze whether group incentives for attendance can be effective in increasing attendance and reducing dropout. To investigate this question, we divide the program’s sessions (at the instructor level) into four treatment arms: (1) A treatment where students are combined into self-chosen two-person teams, with rewards for the team with the maximum joint attendance in a term, (2) A treatment where students are combined into exogenously chosen two-person teams, with rewards for the team with the maximum joint attendance in a term, (3) A treatment where students individually rewarded for maximum attendance in a term, and (4) A control group where no incentives are implemented. We anticipate that the team incentives (treatments 1 and 2) will increase attendance and decrease dropout compared to the individual rewards. We further analyze the impact of the incentives on the development of English and non-cognitive skills.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Debnath, Sisir and Tarun Jain. 2018. "Do team-based input incentives boost skill development? Evidence from India." AEA RCT Registry. December 10. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.3645-1.0.
Former Citation
Debnath, Sisir, Tarun Jain and Tarun Jain. 2018. "Do team-based input incentives boost skill development? Evidence from India." AEA RCT Registry. December 10. http://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/3645/history/38639.
Sponsors & Partners

There are documents in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
The experiment was conducted with the universe of the partner organization’s students. The organization consists of multiple facilitators, each running 4 sessions per day with 20 students each. We randomize the facilitators into the treatment arms described above. The baseline data was collected starting September 2017, as new sessions were beginning. The one year program lasted till December 2018, when we started collecting the endline data.
Intervention Start Date
2017-10-01
Intervention End Date
2018-12-01
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
The primary outcomes are (1) daily attendance as measured by the program's administrative records, (2) dropout, (3) Scores on tests administered by the partner, (4) Scores on cognitive skills test administered through a survey module, (5) Scores on non-cognitive skills test administered through a survey module.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
The experiment was conducted with the universe of the partner organization’s students. The organization consists of multiple facilitators, each running 4 sessions per day with 20 students each. We randomize the facilitators into the treatment arms described above. The baseline data was collected starting September 2017, as new sessions were beginning. The one year program lasted till December 2018, when we started collecting the endline data.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
We randomize the facilitators who run each session into a treatment arm. The randomization was conducted on a computer using Stata.
Randomization Unit
The unit of randomization is a facilitator who runs four sessions each.
Was the treatment clustered?
Yes
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
There are 253 facilitators in the experiment.
Sample size: planned number of observations
The anticipated number of students in the experiment is 20240.
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
The number of facilitators in each treatment arm is 63 for treatment with self-chosen teams, 61 for treatment with exogenously chosen team, 63 in the individual reward treatment, and 66 in the control group.
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Indian School of Business
IRB Approval Date
2017-08-29
IRB Approval Number
ISB-IRB 2017-25
Post-Trial
Post Trial Information
Study Withdrawal
Intervention
Is the intervention completed?
No
Is data collection complete?
Data Publication
Data Publication
Is public data available?
No
Program Files
Program Files
Reports, Papers & Other Materials
Relevant Paper(s)
REPORTS & OTHER MATERIALS