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Estimating Causal Intergenerational Impacts of Parent Human Capital Interventions in Kenya
Last registered on May 03, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Estimating Causal Intergenerational Impacts of Parent Human Capital Interventions in Kenya
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0003995
Initial registration date
March 10, 2019
Last updated
May 03, 2019 8:36 PM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
UC Berkeley
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
University of Oklahoma
PI Affiliation
University of California, Berkeley
PI Affiliation
University of California, Berkeley
PI Affiliation
University of California, Berkeley
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2018-09-19
End date
2020-12-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
This project will create a dataset consisting of the children of individuals who themselves previously benefited from a randomized health (deworming), vocational education, and/or cash grant intervention. The project will exploit experimental variation to estimate the causal impact of these earlier programs on the health, cognitive development, and other outcomes of the recipients’ children, overcoming the key methodological problem of confounding. The project will survey approximately 7,000 children aged 3-8 of the 7,500 respondents in the Kenya Life Panel Survey (KLPS), creating the new KLPS-Kids dataset, to estimate the extent to which these programs can help break the intergenerational transmission of poverty. Note that a pilot version of this trial was previously registered as AEA RCT #728.
Registration Citation
Citation
Fernald, Lia et al. 2019. "Estimating Causal Intergenerational Impacts of Parent Human Capital Interventions in Kenya." AEA RCT Registry. May 03. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.3995-3.0
Former Citation
Fernald, Lia et al. 2019. "Estimating Causal Intergenerational Impacts of Parent Human Capital Interventions in Kenya." AEA RCT Registry. May 03. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/3995/history/45934
Sponsors & Partners

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Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
There is no additional intervention undertaken for this study. The interventions analyzed were conducted during 1998-2003 (deworming), 2009-2011 (vocational training), and 2013-2014 (cash grants).
Intervention Start Date
2018-09-19
Intervention End Date
2020-12-31
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
The primary outcomes are nested within two broad categories of outcomes, Primary Child Outcomes and Child Investment Outcomes. Included in Primary Child Outcomes are four families of outcomes: (1) Language and Cognitive Abilities (drawing on Language, Math & Spatial Abilities, and Executive Function Sub-Indices), (2) Behavior & Socio-Emotional Development, (3) Subjective Health, and (4) Height. Included in Child Investment Outcomes are four families of outcomes: (5) Early Life Health Investments, (6) Home Environment Investments, (7) Schooling Enrollment and Educational Investments, and (8) Child Discipline Strategies.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Construction of these primary outcomes is detailed in our pre-analysis plan.
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
We specify a number of secondary outcomes in our pre-analysis plan.
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
The project will survey a randomly selected subset of approximately 7,000 children aged 3-8 of 7,500 adult respondents in the Kenya Life Panel Survey (KLPS), creating the new KLPS-Kids dataset. The original KLPS sample contains Kenyans who participated in one or more of three earlier interventions: a health study known as the Primary School Deworming Program (PSDP; described in detail in Miguel and Kremer, 2004), a vocational training voucher study, or a cash grant intervention (described in detail in Hicks et al., 2015c).

Previous results indicate that primary school deworming led to health, schooling, and labor market gains in young adulthood, even 10 years after the launch of the program (Baird et al., 2016). Although existing work does not find much evidence of substantial labor market gains due to vocational training (Hicks et al., 2015c), findings do suggest substantial self-employment profit gains, at least in the short run, due to unconditional cash grants (Hicks et al., 2015b). These sizeable direct impacts on parents provide a potential channel for the intergenerational impacts on their children that we will study in the current project, although it is possible that gains for parents in unmeasured dimensions might also influence child outcomes.

In order to measure the impacts on the recipients’ children, this project will create locally appropriate versions of both standard and innovative survey instruments designed to measure various domains of development among children aged 3-5 and 6-8. Since the selection of beneficiaries for the PSDP, vocational training voucher, and cash grants were randomized, the data will enable the estimation of causal impacts of these programs on recipients’ children’s outcomes, overcoming the key methodological problem of confounding.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
The randomization performed for the PSDP is described in Miguel et al. (2014), "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities,Data User's Guide", Center for Effective Global Action Working Paper #40. The randomization method for the vocational training and cash grants interventions is described in Hicks et al., 2015c.
Randomization Unit
The adults were randomized into the PSDP at the school level, and were randomized into the vocational training voucher and cash grants interventions at the individual level. Adults and children chosen for followup in the present project are randomized at the individual level.
Was the treatment clustered?
Yes
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
75 schools in the PSDP (73 schools included in the follow-up sample).
Sample size: planned number of observations
7,000 children
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
For the PSDP follow-up study, 48 schools are in the treatment group, and 25 are in the control.
For the vocational training study, 1,055 individuals are in the treatment group, and 1,108 are in the control group.
For the cash grants study, 950 individuals are in the treatment group and 1,213 are in the control group.
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
Supporting Documents and Materials

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IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Maseno University Ethics Review Committee
IRB Approval Date
2017-04-24
IRB Approval Number
MSU/DRPC/MUERC/0069/14
IRB Name
Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects, University of California, Berkeley
IRB Approval Date
2017-03-14
IRB Approval Number
2016-09-9151
Analysis Plan

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