Improving Job Search: Matching, Cognition, and Nudges

Last registered on May 31, 2022

Pre-Trial

Trial Information

General Information

Title
Improving Job Search: Matching, Cognition, and Nudges
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0004036
Initial registration date
March 26, 2019

Initial registration date is when the trial was registered.

It corresponds to when the registration was submitted to the Registry to be reviewed for publication.

First published
March 31, 2019, 11:09 PM EDT

First published corresponds to when the trial was first made public on the Registry after being reviewed.

Last updated
May 31, 2022, 11:55 AM EDT

Last updated is the most recent time when changes to the trial's registration were published.

Locations

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Primary Investigator

Affiliation

Other Primary Investigator(s)

PI Affiliation
University of Lausanne
PI Affiliation
University of Geneva
PI Affiliation
University of Lausanne
PI Affiliation
University of Geneva

Additional Trial Information

Status
In development
Start date
2019-04-01
End date
2024-01-01
Secondary IDs
Prior work
This trial does not extend or rely on any prior RCTs.
Abstract
Getting the unemployed back into work is an important policy agenda and the central mandate for employment agencies. But the tools available to employment agencies, e.g. search verification, or active labor market programs, do not yet support job seekers much in solving one of the key challenges of job search finding the right vacancies to apply to. Job seekers may be looking for jobs that are not well suited for them, or out of the range that is feasible. In addition, job seekers may face cognitive challenges due to anxiety and stress, which reduce working memory and impair decisions, affecting their capacity to learn from their own experience, or search for diverse sets of job positions. We propose a field experiment to improve job search with three interventions: (i) improve the match between job seekers and vacancies based on new information on the job seeker ("J4U" intervention), and (ii) provide cognitive training that has been shown to improve participants' ability to plan activities, work on multiple tasks in parallel, and make decisions ("COG" intervention). These abilities are central in job search.
External Link(s)

Registration Citation

Citation
Benghalem, Helene et al. 2022. "Improving Job Search: Matching, Cognition, and Nudges." AEA RCT Registry. May 31. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.4036-1.1
Former Citation
Benghalem, Helene et al. 2022. "Improving Job Search: Matching, Cognition, and Nudges." AEA RCT Registry. May 31. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/4036/history/145162
Sponsors & Partners

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Experimental Details

Interventions

Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2019-04-01
Intervention End Date
2023-03-01

Primary Outcomes

Primary Outcomes (end points)
Job search intensity and unemployment duration
Primary Outcomes (explanation)

Secondary Outcomes

Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)

Experimental Design

Experimental Design
We propose an implementation plan that allows testing whether the two interventions are complementary. Job seekers could be able to use information much better once their cognitive capabilities have been improved. We take this into account by implementing a design that tests each intervention in isolation, but also in combination with one other intervention. Job seekers will be randomly assigned to one of four groups:
- a control group;
- a J4U group with information on jobs for you;
- a COG group with cognitive training;
- a J4U+COG group cognition training, and information on jobs for you.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomization done in office by a computer
Randomization Unit
Individual
Was the treatment clustered?
No

Experiment Characteristics

Sample size: planned number of clusters
/
Sample size: planned number of observations
1500 job seekers
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
529 job seekers in total from canton of Neuch√Ętel
ongoing recruitment on canton of Vaud
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs)

IRB Name
Ethics committee of HEC Lausanne
IRB Approval Date
2017-10-03
IRB Approval Number
N/A