Scarcity and Cheating
Last registered on July 16, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Scarcity and Cheating
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0004248
Initial registration date
June 10, 2019
Last updated
July 16, 2019 9:09 AM EDT
Location(s)

This section is unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
University of Heidelberg
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
University of Heidelberg
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2019-06-11
End date
2022-05-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
An emerging literature suggests that feelings of poverty might impose cognitive load and therefore lead to less deliberate decision-making (Mani et al 2013). To date there is little evidence on the consequences for economic decisions. We investigate here the possibility that scarcity influences unethical behavior.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Fehr, Dietmar and Yannick Reichlin. 2019. "Scarcity and Cheating." AEA RCT Registry. July 16. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/4248/history/50112
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
We will prime participants with financial worries and explore how feelings of poverty affect unethical behavior
Intervention Start Date
2019-06-11
Intervention End Date
2021-06-01
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Cheating, measured through die-under-the cup paradigme (Fischbacher & Föllmi, 2013)
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Cognitive Ability
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
We will ask participants to reflect about their financial situation. We will vary the intensity of the financial situation, ie whether the financial problems are severe or easy. Subsequently, we elicit participants' cheating behavior through a die roll and cognitive ability through a version of the CRT.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomization into treatment and randomization of the order of questions is done by the survey software.
Randomization Unit
Randomization at the individual level.
Was the treatment clustered?
Yes
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
N=600 participants
Sample size: planned number of observations
N=600 participants
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
Hard financial prime: N=300
Easy financial prime: N=300
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
IRB Approval Date
IRB Approval Number
Analysis Plan

There are documents in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information