How Research Affects Policy: Evidence from a Demand and Beliefs Experiment
Last registered on June 17, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
How Research Affects Policy: Evidence from a Demand and Beliefs Experiment
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0004274
Initial registration date
June 03, 2019
Last updated
June 17, 2019 11:16 AM EDT
Location(s)
Region
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Harvard University
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
PUC Rio
PI Affiliation
University of California, Davis
PI Affiliation
Columbia
Additional Trial Information
Status
Completed
Start date
2017-05-15
End date
2019-06-01
Secondary IDs
Abstract
We carry out an experiment with more than 900 municipal officials (mayors, council members, and municipal secretaries) in Brazil to measure their demand for research information and to identify what types of research findings change their beliefs.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Hjort, Jonas et al. 2019. "How Research Affects Policy: Evidence from a Demand and Beliefs Experiment." AEA RCT Registry. June 17. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.4274-1.0.
Former Citation
Hjort, Jonas et al. 2019. "How Research Affects Policy: Evidence from a Demand and Beliefs Experiment." AEA RCT Registry. June 17. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/4274/history/48243.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2017-05-15
Intervention End Date
2018-05-24
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Beliefs about policy effectiveness; Willingness-To-Pay for research studies
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
Participants of a series of national and regional conferences of municipalities (mayors and other municipal officials) were invited to answer a tablet interactive survey where information on Early-Childhood Development (ECD) programs was presented. Participants were asked to elicit their prior beliefs about likely effect sizes of an ECD program. We offered randomly-selected research studies information for purchase. Then, asked participants to elicit their Willingness-To-Pay (in terms of lottery tickets for a trip to the US) to learn the estimated effect sizes from research studies. After the random price was drawn, the studies’ results were revealed (or not). Finally, we measured posterior beliefs about likely effect sizes, and offered a policy implementation report describing how to implement and ECD program for purchase.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
Randomization by computer
Randomization Unit
Individual, Individual x Round
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
900
Sample size: planned number of observations
900 individuals, multiple observations per individual depending on the outcome measure
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
We don't have discrete treatment arms as such. Participants are offered multiple randomly-selected studies sequentially in multiple rounds.
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
IRB Approval Date
IRB Approval Number
Post-Trial
Post Trial Information
Study Withdrawal
Intervention
Is the intervention completed?
No
Is data collection complete?
Data Publication
Data Publication
Is public data available?
No
Program Files
Program Files
Reports and Papers
Preliminary Reports
Relevant Papers