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Community Policing and Public Trust: Pakistan
Last registered on July 10, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Community Policing and Public Trust: Pakistan
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0004383
Initial registration date
June 26, 2019
Last updated
July 10, 2019 11:34 AM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
Princeton University
PI Affiliation
Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS)
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2018-02-01
End date
2020-12-31
Secondary IDs
G30 General, K38 Human Rights Law • Gender Law, D73 Bureaucracy • Administrative Processes in Public Organizations • Corruption,K40 General
Abstract
This RCT examines the impact of two policing innovations in Pakistan: citizen-centric problem-oriented policing (CPOP) and gender inclusive citizen-centric problem-oriented policing (CPOP-G). The CPOP arm incorporates community engagement and problem-oriented
policing. The CPOP-G arm engages women in addition to men. Because local social norms prevent mixed-gender meetings, and because women may not be willing to discuss family and gender-related issues in mixed company, female constables in the CPOP-G arm will
conduct woman-only forums.

The study site is the Sheikhupura Range. Both arms will be piloted in Kasur district and the actual experiment run in Sheikhupura and Nakana districts. Key outcomes are: citizen perceptions of crime and safety; police perceptions of citizens; police activity as measured through surveys and administrative data; and crime levels measured through administrative data. We will use a wide range of administrative data as well as surveys of citizens and police to measure changes in policing practices.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Cheema, Ali, Ali Hasanain and Jacob Shapiro. 2019. "Community Policing and Public Trust: Pakistan." AEA RCT Registry. July 10. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.4383-1.0.
Former Citation
Cheema, Ali, Ali Hasanain and Jacob Shapiro. 2019. "Community Policing and Public Trust: Pakistan." AEA RCT Registry. July 10. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/4383/history/49667.
Sponsors & Partners

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Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
This RCT examines the impact of two policing innovations in Pakistan: citizen-centric problem-oriented policing (CPOP) and gender inclusive citizen-centric problem-oriented policing (CPOP-G). The CPOP arm incorporates community engagement and problem-oriented
policing. The CPOP-G arm engages women in addition to men. Because local social norms prevent mixed-gender meetings, and because women may not be willing to discuss family and gender-related issues in mixed company, female constables in the CPOP-G arm will conduct woman-only forums.
Intervention Start Date
2019-02-18
Intervention End Date
2020-08-31
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
We have two main family of outcomes:
1. Individual Level Outcomes
2. Administrative Level Outcomes

1. a) Citizen attitudes
1. b) Citizen cooperation with police
1. c) Security of Life and Property
1. d) Police attitudes and time allocation

2. a) Rates of Crime and Violence
2. b) Police patrols
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
See pre analysis plan
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomization done in office by a computer
Randomization Unit
We choose beat because "beat" is the smallest administrative unit of police. Beats are assigned to Assistant Sub-Inspectors or Sub-Inspectors for patrolling, surveillance and collection of intelligence.
Was the treatment clustered?
Yes
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
Our sample has 108 beats (cluster)
Sample size: planned number of observations
Each beat has 32 individuals making a total sample of 3456 individuals
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
Our sample has 108 beats i.e. 36 CPOP 36 CPOP-G and 36 Control beats
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
 For outcome measured with administrative crime data we are well powered to detect treatment effects of .25 SD and up.  For outcomes measured with surveys we are well powered to detect treatment effects of .15 SD and up for a dif-in-dif with one post-treatment round and .1 SD with two post-treatment rounds.  For spillovers measured with police surveys we are well powered to detect spillovers of 50 percent of the treatment size and up.  For spillovers measured with GPS logs we are highly powered to detect variation at the vehicle/day level.
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Princeton University IRB
IRB Approval Date
2019-05-30
IRB Approval Number
0000007250
Analysis Plan

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