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Parental Leave and Fathers’ Careers
Last registered on September 16, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Parental Leave and Fathers’ Careers
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0004694
Initial registration date
September 11, 2019
Last updated
September 16, 2019 2:07 PM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
DIW Berlin
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
PI Affiliation
JKU Linz
PI Affiliation
DIW Berlin
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2019-09-12
End date
2020-12-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
The share of fathers taking parental leave in Germany has been steadily increasing since the introduction of the so-called “daddy-months” in 2007. However, the vast majority of fathers who take parental leave only takes two months, whereas most mothers take 12 months. There is some evidence from qualitative studies suggesting that fathers fear disadvantages in the labor market if they take leaves longer than two months. These disadvantages may arise due to the violation of social norms regarding the gendered division of work and due to the signaling of lower productivity due to family orientation. We study the impact of parental leave-taking on employment opportunities of fathers and mothers using a field experiment.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Schmieder, Julia et al. 2019. "Parental Leave and Fathers’ Careers." AEA RCT Registry. September 16. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.4694-1.0.
Sponsors & Partners

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Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
We address our research questions using a large-scale correspondence study.
Intervention Start Date
2019-09-12
Intervention End Date
2020-09-11
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
[1] Whether application received a callback, i.e. dummy variable equal to one if the application received a callback and zero otherwise, [2] Whether application received an invitation, i.e. dummy variable equal to one if the application received an invitation and zero otherwise
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
A callback is defined as a personalized phone, e-mail, or mail contact by a potential employer. This is usually a request for an interview, but employers also contact applicants asking for “more information” or state that they “have a few questions.”

An invitation is defined as a personalized phone, e-mail, or mail contact in which the potential employer expresses interest in conducting an interview.
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
Correspondence study design involving a between-subject design.

Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomization is automated.
Randomization Unit
Job advertisement
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
9,000
Sample size: planned number of observations
9,000
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
600 in each of the 15 treatment arms
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
Based on power analyses using the average callback rates we observed in a pilot version of our study, we plan to send out approximately 600 applications per treatment arm. Since we have 15 treatment arms, we send out approximately 9,000 applications. With this sample size, we can detect an about eight percentage points difference in callback rates between resumes from two different treatment arms at a five percent significance level with 80 percent power.
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Committee of experts at DIW Berlin
IRB Approval Date
2019-07-25
IRB Approval Number
N/A