Individual ambiguity attitudes: Measurement and behavioral consequences
Last registered on October 07, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Individual ambiguity attitudes: Measurement and behavioral consequences
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0004818
Initial registration date
October 04, 2019
Last updated
October 07, 2019 9:30 AM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Colorado College
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
Loyola Marymount University
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2019-10-04
End date
2020-03-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
This study plans to examine different measures of ambiguity attitudes and their relationship with survey measures of behaviors thought to be influenced by uncertainty preferences in a low-income population in Kenya.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Hoel, Jessica and Prachi Jain. 2019. "Individual ambiguity attitudes: Measurement and behavioral consequences." AEA RCT Registry. October 07. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.4818-1.0.
Sponsors & Partners

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Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
The experiment will be conducted at the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Fall 2019. Busara’s participant pool is broadly representative of Nairobi and Kenya. For a separate study, participants will complete risk, time, and form-of-payment multiple price list preference elicitation tasks. Participants also complete a questionnaire, which includes a series of demographic questions and questions about their usage of mobile money. For this study, participants also complete several ambiguity attitude measurement tasks.
Intervention Start Date
2019-10-08
Intervention End Date
2019-12-31
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
We measure several behaviors thought to be influenced by uncertainty attitudes: smoking, taking a loan, working as a day laborer, and starting a new business. Each behavior is measured as a binary variable: "Have you done X in the last 12 months?"

Behaviors will be examined individually, and aggregated by principal component analysis.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
We measure ambiguity attitudes in four ways: 1) A multiple price list, similar to l'Haridon et al. (2018) and Barham et al. (2014); 2) A menu task, similar to Cardenas and Carpenter (2013), 3) A matching probabilities task, similar to Dimmock et al. (2016); and 4) qualitative survey questions, inspired by Dohmen et al. (2011). All subjects complete all 4 tasks. The order of the first 3 tasks will be randomized at the session level. The qualitative survey questions will always be asked last.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
The order of tasks is randomized by computer. The quantitative task chosen to pay out is chosen at random by a zTree.
Randomization Unit
The randomization of the order of tasks is at the session level. The randomization of which task pays out is randomized at the individual level.
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
The treatment is not clustered.
Sample size: planned number of observations
330 subjects.
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
N/A
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Loyola Marymount University Institutional Review Board
IRB Approval Date
2019-09-05
IRB Approval Number
LMU IRB 2019 FA 09-R
IRB Name
Colorado College Institutional Review Board
IRB Approval Date
2019-08-21
IRB Approval Number
N/A
IRB Name
Maseno University Ethics Review Committee
IRB Approval Date
2019-06-25
IRB Approval Number
MSU/DRPC/MUERC/000011/13