Stress management among University Lecturers: Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Yoga
Last registered on March 06, 2020

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Stress management among University Lecturers: Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Yoga
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0005532
Initial registration date
March 04, 2020
Last updated
March 06, 2020 3:06 PM EST
Location(s)
Region
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
University of Johannesburg
Other Primary Investigator(s)
Additional Trial Information
Status
Completed
Start date
2019-01-28
End date
2019-12-18
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Job-related stress is associated with employees’ physical and mental health conditions that threaten organizational outcomes. This study investigated the effectiveness of Yoga-based cognitive behavioral therapy reducing occupational stress among University teachers in Anambra and Enugu states, Nigeria. Participants included 93 academic staff members from two Federal Universities in two States in Nigeria. Participants were randomly assigned to Y-CBT (N=46) and waitlist control (N=47) groups. The Y-CBT group participated in a 2 hours Y-CBT program weekly for a period of 12 weeks. Two instruments- Single Item Stress Questionnaire (SISQ) and Teachers’ Stress Inventory (TSI) were used to collect data. Data were collected at baseline; post-test and follow-up evaluations. Means, standard deviations, t-test statistics, repeated measures ANOVA and bar charts were used to analyze data for the study. Results revealed that the perception of stressors and stress symptoms reduced significantly at post-test and follow up assessments among the Y-CBT group, compared to the waitlisted group. It was concluded that Y-CBT modalities could help to minimize the perception of stressors and stress manifestation among university teachers.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Onyishi, Charity. 2020. "Stress management among University Lecturers: Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Yoga." AEA RCT Registry. March 06. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.5532-1.0.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
A Yoga-Cognitive behavioural therapy program manual was developed by two of the researchers in collaboration with two experts (one in CBT and the other in Yoga). In developing the manual, CBT strategies were blended with after-session Yoga exercises. The CBT sessions were based on using the “ABCDE” model (Antecedent/Activating event, Beliefs, Consequences, Disputing, and Effective new philosophy) to identify, assess, revalidate and change unhelpful absolutistic and irrational beliefs associated with work experiences. The major aims of Y-CBT were to 1) use ABCDE group therapeutic model (CBT) in “disputing” – challenging and questioning lecturers’ work-related irrational and dysfunctional beliefs and to replace them with rather helpful and functional beliefs(DiGiuseppe, Doyle, Dryden, & Backx, 2014; Ogbuanya, Eseadi, Orji, Ede, Ohanu, & Bakare, 2017) 2); use yoga to reduce the physiological symptoms of stress and helping the participants out of the vicious circle of negative thoughts through Yoga “Victory Meditation,” affirmations and physical exercises (Khalsa, et al., 2015). This framework helped provide a targeted mind/body approach to stress perceptions, reactions, and symptoms.
Intervention Start Date
2019-03-19
Intervention End Date
2019-07-09
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Results revealed that the perception of stressors and stress symptoms reduced significantly at post-test and follow up assessments among the Y-CBT group, compared to the waitlisted group.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Results revealed that the perception of stressors and stress symptoms reduced significantly at post-test and follow up assessments among the Y-CBT group, compared to the waitlisted group.
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
The current study adopted a group-randomized waitlist control trial design with pretest, post-test and follow-up assessments. The ABCDE was formed the basis of explaining the relationships links between activating (A) events associated with lecturing job and promotion, dysfunctional thoughts, beliefs or cognitions arising from those events (B); the emotional and behavioral consequences of the beliefs (C) (DiGiuseppe, Doyle, Dryden, & Backx, 2014). Activating event (A) in lecturing in the university could include handling students’ behavioral problems, extra work-load, publication challenges, personal experiences; the belief (B) is the interpretation and cognitive imagery formed due to “A”. Such cognition about the event (B) elicits a consequence/effect (C) for the teacher, which may be adaptive or maladaptive.
Experimental Design Details
The current study adopted a group-randomized waitlist control trial design with pretest, post-test and follow-up assessments. The ABCDE was formed the basis of explaining the relationships links between activating (A) events associated with lecturing job and promotion, dysfunctional thoughts, beliefs or cognitions arising from those events (B); the emotional and behavioral consequences of the beliefs (C) (DiGiuseppe, Doyle, Dryden, & Backx, 2014). Activating event (A) in lecturing in the university could include handling students’ behavioral problems, extra work-load, publication challenges, personal experiences; the belief (B) is the interpretation and cognitive imagery formed due to “A”. Such cognition about the event (B) elicits a consequence/effect (C) for the teacher, which may be adaptive or maladaptive.
Randomization Method
The 93 potential participants who met all the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to Y-CBT group (46 participants) and wait-list control group (47 participants) (see Figure 2) using a sequence allocation software (participants were asked to pick 1 envelope containing pressure-sensitive paper labeled with either Y-CBT or WLG-Waitlist Group) from a container. Information about randomization was concealed from the participants until the intervention was assigned.
Randomization Unit
The 93 potential participants who met all the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to Y-CBT group (46 participants) and wait-list control group (47 participants) (see Figure 2) using a sequence allocation software (participants were asked to pick 1 envelope containing pressure-sensitive paper labeled with either Y-CBT or WLG-Waitlist Group) from a container. Information about randomization was concealed from the participants until the intervention was assigned.
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
93 university teachers
Sample size: planned number of observations
93 university teachers
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
46 university teachers, 47 control group
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Faculty of Education ethical committee
IRB Approval Date
2019-01-13
IRB Approval Number
FUNAI/REC/ED/18/00012
Post-Trial
Post Trial Information
Study Withdrawal
Intervention
Is the intervention completed?
No
Is data collection complete?
Data Publication
Data Publication
Is public data available?
No
Program Files
Program Files
Reports, Papers & Other Materials
Relevant Paper(s)
REPORTS & OTHER MATERIALS