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Impact evaluation of Jeevika
Last registered on April 24, 2015

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Impact evaluation of Jeevika
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0000570
Initial registration date
April 24, 2015
Last updated
April 24, 2015 1:34 PM EDT
Location(s)
Region
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
World Bank
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
World Bank
PI Affiliation
IFPRI
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2011-07-01
End date
2016-06-30
Secondary IDs
Abstract
This study is a randomized impact evaluation of JEEViKA, the flagship rural poverty reduction program of the State of Bihar. The primary goal of JEEViKA is to promote socio-economic inclusion of impoverished rural households by mobilizing women into self-help groups (SHGs). SHG members meet regularly to participate in savings, borrowing and repayments; additionally, the group provides an opportunity for 10-15 women of similar backgrounds to come together and discuss their day-to-day lives. Each SHG member is required to deposit 10-20 cents in a joint account weekly; once sufficient equity is established, members may begin drawing credit from this pool. After some weeks or months of demonstrated group savings, JEEViKA provides the SHG with a one-time grant of 900 USD, which the SHG may disburse as loans to its members. JEEViKA then links SHGs to banks in order to leverage funds from formal credit institutions. The annual cost of credit to SHG members through the program is 24%, well below rates charged by informal creditors in the study setting. The primary outcomes of the evaluation are households' financial position at endline (value of high-cost debt held; average interest rate on household debt; asset position), and indicators of women's autonomy, decision-making role within the household, and propensity to engage in collective action.

External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Datta, Upamanyu, Vivian Hoffmann and Vijayendra Rao. 2015. "Impact evaluation of Jeevika." AEA RCT Registry. April 24. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.570-1.0.
Former Citation
Datta, Upamanyu, Vivian Hoffmann and Vijayendra Rao. 2015. "Impact evaluation of Jeevika." AEA RCT Registry. April 24. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/570/history/4185.
Sponsors & Partners

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Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
The primary goal of JEEViKA is to promote socio-economic inclusion of rural impoverished households by mobilizing women members from such families into SHGs (Self Help Groups). SHG members meet regularly to participate in savings, borrowing and repayments; additionally, the group provides an opportunity for 10-15 women of similar backgrounds to come together and discuss their day-to-day lives. Each member is required to deposit 10-20 cents weekly; once some equity is established, the members may begin drawing credit from this pool. After some weeks or months of demonstrated group savings, the project provides the SHG with a one-time grant of 900 USD, which the SHG may disburse as loans to its members. Going forward, the goal is to link SHGs to banks and leverage funds from formal credit institutions. The annual cost of credit to SHG members is 24%, a relatively low rate compared to those charged by existing informal creditors. Once a minimum number (10-15) of SHGs form in a village, they are federated into a Village Organization (VO). The VO acts as a platform through which JEEViKA initiatives, such as linkages with NGO-led income generating projects or government programs, are communicated to SHG members. The VO also has a mandate to identify issues at the village level and liaise with the project’s staff to provide practical solutions.
Intervention Start Date
2012-01-01
Intervention End Date
2015-12-31
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Key outcome variables are:
- membership of at least one household member in a self-help group
- at least one household member saved during the past year
- total value of outstanding high-cost household debt (defined as loans with an annual interest rate of greater than or equal to 48%)
- average annual rate of interest on cost household debt
- proportion of adult women in the household involved in income-generating activities
- productive asset ownership at the household level
- consumption asset ownership at the household level
- housing quality
- households access one or more government schemes (e.g. NREGS employment, panchayat pensions, PDS card)
- women's ability to travel alone or accompanied
- women's participation in household level decision making
- women's propensity to participate in collective action
- women's aspirations regarding educational attainment and profession for their children, in particular for girls
- value of total consumption per adult equivalent
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
In 2010, JEEViKA was expanding into its ‘Phase 2’ areas, 37 new blocks of 9 districts, providing an opportunity to rigorously evaluate this flagship project. 180 panchayats were randomly selected for inclusion in the study from within 16 blocks in 7 districts in which JEEViKA was planning to scale up. In each of the study panchayats, one to two villages were then randomly selected for inclusion in the study. In each study village, one or more hamlets in which the majority of the populated belonged to a scheduled caste or scheduled tribe was identified, and households were randomly selected within these. Overall, 9000 households were interviewed at baseline in the 180 study panchayats using a structured data collection instrument. In addition, focus group discussions were held in each study village, one to which all community residents were invited, including men and women, and one which was restricted to women in targeted areas of the community (the intended beneficiaries of the intervention). The purpose of these discussions was to understand baseline community characteristics and capabilities. At the time of the baseline survey, which was fielded from July to early October 2011, JEEViKA was not operating in any of the study panchayats.
Prior to treatment assignment, study panchayats were stratified by block and by the average outstanding value of high-cost loans (defined as loans which have a monthly interest rate equal to 4% and above) reported by households surveyed at baseline. Panchayats were then assigned to either treatment or control status using a random number generator.
JEEViKA began operating in the treatment panchayats of 3 districts in January 2012. Rollout was delayed for the other 4 districts, where baseline work for a parallel qualitative study was being conducted. JEEViKA moved into the remaining treatment panchayats in April 2012. After over two years of project activities in the treatment areas, the first follow-up survey began in July 2014 and is projected to be complete by early October, 2014. A second follow-up survey is planned to begin in July 2015.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
Prior to treatment assignment, study panchayats were stratified by block and by the average outstanding value of high-cost loans (defined as loans which have a monthly interest rate equal to 4% and above) reported by households surveyed at baseline. Panchayats were then assigned to either treatment or control status using a random number generator.
Randomization Unit
Panchayat
Was the treatment clustered?
Yes
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
180
Sample size: planned number of observations
9000
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
90 panchayats treatment (intervention started January-April 2012), 90 panchayats control (intervention to begin after first follow-up survey)
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
International Food Policy Research Institute Institutional Review Board
IRB Approval Date
2015-03-17
IRB Approval Number
2015-9-MTID-M
Analysis Plan

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Post-Trial
Post Trial Information
Study Withdrawal
Intervention
Is the intervention completed?
No
Is data collection complete?
Data Publication
Data Publication
Is public data available?
No
Program Files
Program Files
Reports and Papers
Preliminary Reports
Relevant Papers