The Social Costs of Being Undocumented

Last registered on August 28, 2020

Pre-Trial

Trial Information

General Information

Title
The Social Costs of Being Undocumented
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0006103
Initial registration date
July 16, 2020
Last updated
August 28, 2020, 5:01 PM EDT

Locations

Region

Primary Investigator

Affiliation
Columbia University

Other Primary Investigator(s)

PI Affiliation
PI Affiliation

Additional Trial Information

Status
In development
Start date
2020-07-06
End date
2021-07-01
Secondary IDs
Abstract
We present a representative sample of the U.S. population the story of one of two Mexican immigrants, a 20-something college student and a 40-something retail worker. After describing the person we randomly state one of three possible scenarios (a) nothing, (b) that the person is a legal U.S. resident from Mexico, and (c) that the person is an undocumented immigrant from Mexico. After presenting these scenarios, we ask survey takers about different social choices they would make, such as inviting them to their house, introducing them to their friends, and others. We estimate changes in the likelihood of doing these social actions across conditions as the 'social costs of being undocumented'.
External Link(s)

Registration Citation

Citation
Charleston, Aileen, Jorge Guzman and Anna Ortega. 2020. "The Social Costs of Being Undocumented." AEA RCT Registry. August 28. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.6103-1.1
Experimental Details

Interventions

Intervention(s)
We present a representative sample of the U.S. population the story of one of two Mexican immigrants, a 20-something college student and a 40-something retail worker. After describing the person we randomly state one of three possible scenarios (a) nothing, (b) that the person is a legal U.S. resident from Mexico, and (c) that the person is an undocumented immigrant from Mexico. After presenting these scenarios, we ask survey takers about different social choices they would make, such as inviting them to their house, introducing them to their friends, and others. We estimate changes in the likelihood of doing these social actions across conditions as the 'social costs of being undocumented'.
Intervention Start Date
2020-07-06
Intervention End Date
2021-07-01

Primary Outcomes

Primary Outcomes (end points)
Logit models, with the dependent variable equal to 1 for individuals who choose "Likely" to each of the following questions:

How likely are you to consider being her friend?
How likely are you to have a coffee with her in a public space?
How likely are you to help her find a job and help progress her career?
How likely are you to introduce her to your friends?
How likely are you to consider inviting her to a party or a social event?
How likely are you to consider introducing her to your family?

We wil also include an index called "Social Index" as the sum of all questions.

All regressions will include controls for demographics and location.

Primary Outcomes (explanation)
We wil also include an index called "Social Index" as the sum of all questions.

Secondary Outcomes

Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Variation of these outcomes across some demographics such as income levels, age, and gender.
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)

Experimental Design

Experimental Design
We present a representative sample of the U.S. population the story of one of two Mexican immigrants, a 20-something college student and a 40-something retail worker. After describing the person we randomly state one of three possible scenarios (a) nothing, (b) that the person is a legal U.S. resident from Mexico, and (c) that the person is an undocumented immigrant from Mexico. We then ask these survey takers about different social choices they would make, such as inviting them to their house, introducing them to their friends, and others. We estimate changes in the likelihood of doing these social actions across conditions as the 'social costs of being undocumented'.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
Assigned randomly by qualtrics.
Randomization Unit
Individual survey-taker.
Was the treatment clustered?
No

Experiment Characteristics

Sample size: planned number of clusters
1000
Sample size: planned number of observations
1600 (assuming 40% can be dropped for failing the attention check, then this drops to 1000)
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
1000
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
No known size exists.
Supporting Documents and Materials

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IRB

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs)

IRB Name
Columbia University IRB
IRB Approval Date
2020-07-15
IRB Approval Number
AAAT1759

Post-Trial

Post Trial Information

Study Withdrawal

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Intervention

Is the intervention completed?
No
Data Collection Complete
Data Publication

Data Publication

Is public data available?
No

Program Files

Program Files
Reports, Papers & Other Materials

Relevant Paper(s)

Reports & Other Materials