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Health and economic impact of the covid-19 crisis in South Africa and Brazil: exploring experiences, perceptions and policy preferences
Last registered on October 06, 2020

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Health and economic impact of the covid-19 crisis in South Africa and Brazil: exploring experiences, perceptions and policy preferences
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0006225
Initial registration date
July 26, 2020
Last updated
October 06, 2020 5:23 AM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
LSE
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
London School of Economics
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2020-07-27
End date
2021-06-30
Secondary IDs
Abstract
The Covid19 epidemic is evolving quickly, and so are the related policies and individual behaviours. After introducing various levels of “lockdown” (at the national level for South Africa, and at the local level for Brazil) to reduce the number of covid19 infections, Brazil and South Africa have eased most of these restrictions, partly to preserve peoples’ economic livelihoods. Both countries have since experienced sharp increases in new cases, while the same levels of restrictions are unlikely to be re-introduced given their high economic costs (and lack of effect in Brazil). Hence, the main barriers against the propagation of the virus will probably consist of individuals’ capacity to comply with key public health recommendations (wearing a mask, avoiding public transport, avoiding close proximity with others, etc.), some of which have proved difficult to sustain. Using a survey experience to test the causal impact of optimism vs. pessimism over the availability of a vaccine in the near future, we examine the effect of vaccine duration on perceived effects of health and mortality, the self-reported willingness to comply with a range of social distancing measures over time and preferences for policy.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Lagarde, Mylene and Irene Papanicolas. 2020. "Health and economic impact of the covid-19 crisis in South Africa and Brazil: exploring experiences, perceptions and policy preferences." AEA RCT Registry. October 06. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.6225-1.1.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
This intervention seeks to assess how the framing of the availability of a COVID-19 vaccine in the near future, influences individuals' perceptions of the health risks of the pandemic, wiliingness to adopt protective social distancing behaviours (such as mask wearing, keeping a distance, avoiding large groups), and support for different policies. Through a survey experiment, individuals are randomly assigned to receiving optimistic and pessimistic messages about vaccine availability.
Intervention Start Date
2020-07-27
Intervention End Date
2020-08-30
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Three families of outcomes: (1) the perceived duration of the covid19 crisis and its effects on health and mortality ; (2) the self-reported willingness to comply with a range of social distancing measures over time, and (3) preferences for policy.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
Individuals will be randomised to one of three groups:
- 'optimistic' group: respondents see a short video presenting a series of recent optimistic headlines from local and international newspapers on the future availability of a vaccine.
- 'pessimistic' group: respondents see a short video presenting concerns and doubts about the timeline and efficacy of a potential covid19 vaccine.
- control group: no information
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Respondents will be randomly assigned to treatments via random-number generation during the survey.
Randomization Unit
Individuals
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
na
Sample size: planned number of observations
2500 in South Africa, 5000 in Brazil
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
equal allocation to each group (about 833 per group in South Africa, and 1,666 per group in Brazil)
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
London School of Economics
IRB Approval Date
2020-07-14
IRB Approval Number
1146b
Analysis Plan

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