x

Please fill out this short user survey of only 3 questions in order to help us improve the site. We appreciate your feedback!
How Asynchronous Production Affects Creative Work: Evidence from Bengali Folk Musicians
Last registered on September 23, 2020

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
How Asynchronous Production Affects Creative Work: Evidence from Bengali Folk Musicians
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0006452
Initial registration date
September 22, 2020
Last updated
September 23, 2020 9:41 AM EDT
Location(s)

This section is unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Other Primary Investigator(s)
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2020-08-01
End date
2021-08-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Baul singers’ alienation from digital music production methods means that it is difficult for them to turn out the same quality of songs as, and collaborate with, modern musicians. We are investigating what precisely Baul singers lose in the digital recording process; what challenges does a folk singer face in adapting to different current technologies, specifically, ensemble vs. click-track; is an ability to improvise the creative backbone of Baul music, or is it the synergy value of an ensemble performance, or both; does a change in environment (comfort) change performance quality via increased/decreased confidence, and if so, for whom? Also, how is the music produced itself affected as a result of these new digital technologies?
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Ranganathan, Aruna. 2020. "How Asynchronous Production Affects Creative Work: Evidence from Bengali Folk Musicians ." AEA RCT Registry. September 23. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.6452-1.0.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2020-08-01
Intervention End Date
2020-12-31
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
musical output; surveys measuring subjective experiences
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
Control – The “standard” ensemble way Baul music is recorded.
Treatment – The "non-standard" click-track way Baul music is recorded using the aid of digital technologies.

Singers will be assigned a Baul song of the research team's choosing the evening before recording, being asked to prepare their rendition of it for the next day, to be performed across both the control and treatment conditions.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
randomization done in office by a computer
Randomization Unit
individual
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
100 singers
Sample size: planned number of observations
200 recordings
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
100 control recordings, 100 treatment recordings
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Stanford University
IRB Approval Date
2020-07-24
IRB Approval Number
N/A