Engaging men in household chores and child care through mobile phone-delivered Behavior Change Communications (BCC)
Last registered on April 12, 2021

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Engaging men in household chores and child care through mobile phone-delivered Behavior Change Communications (BCC)
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0007434
Initial registration date
April 09, 2021
Last updated
April 12, 2021 11:51 AM EDT
Location(s)

This section is unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
University of Georgia
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
Grinnel College
PI Affiliation
University of Georgia
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2021-01-01
End date
2022-03-15
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Many development programs in developing countries seek to achieve lasting behavior change in gender norms among their beneficiaries through program interventions. Development programs typically provide their beneficiaries with gender trainings for some period of time, with behavior change often a core element of the programs’ theories of change. As development programs in developing countries increasingly target women in order to improve outcomes for all, questions related with engaging men in the process remain unanswered: How can social stigmas held by men about their participation in household chores and childcare be addressed? Can we achieve more by post training reminders, perhaps in the form of periodical reminders reinforcing training contents, using new technologies like mobile phones? The high penetration of mobile phone adoption in the developing world attracted researchers to look for ways of using mobile phones in delivering information to target populations. We conduct a randomized control trial (RCT) in a population of rural participants in a livelihoods and gender training program, randomly assigning participants to a treatment group, which receives phone-based reinforcement of training messages related to male participation on household chores and childcare. Participants assigned to the control group receive the same number of phone calls addressing a placebo topic unrelated to the treatment.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Assefa, Thomas, Ellen McCullough and Tamara McGavock. 2021. "Engaging men in household chores and child care through mobile phone-delivered Behavior Change Communications (BCC)." AEA RCT Registry. April 12. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.7434-1.0.
Sponsors & Partners

There are documents in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2021-01-13
Intervention End Date
2022-02-28
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
We measure male’s participation in eight household tasks – child care, collecting fuelwood, fetching water, cooking, washing clothes, processing grains, cleaning the house, and washing dishes. We collected information if the man performed these activities yesterday and how many minutes he spends on each activity. We also collected information on the women’s satisfaction with the amount of time that the man contributes towards household chores and child car. We ask this question both in general and specifically towards each of the eight household chores listed above. Furthermore, we collected information about the women’s perception on how the male has changed his participation in household chores between baseline and endline. Using the information collected, we construct two groups of outcome variables: one for the man’s participation in chores and one for woman’s perception about the man’s participation in chores.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Within the first group of outcome variables, we have the following indicators:
- a continuous variable measuring the number of minutes the man spent on each household chore
- a continuous variable measuring the number of minutes the man spent on all household chores in total yesterday
- a dummy indicating whether the man participated in a given household chore or not
- an index constructed by counting the number of household chores in which the man participated.
Within the second group of outcome variables, we have the following indicators:
- a variable indicating the women’s perception of the change in the man’s participation in household chores since baseline
- a likert scale variable indicating how satisfied the women is, with the amount of time the man contributes towards household chores,
- a likert scale variable indicating how satisfied the women is, with the amount of time the man contributes towards overall household chores.
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
To evaluate the impacts of this behavioral intervention, we conduct a randomized control trial (RCT) using close to 900 participants in a rural program seeking to raise participants above the poverty line by enhancing their livelihoods activities. We seek to understand whether cell phones can be used to deepen program impacts by reinforcing behavior change communications. We randomly assign male household heads either to the treatment group, which receives phone-based reinforcement of training messages designed to encourage men to participate in household chores and child care, or the placebo group, which receives similar phone calls addressing an unrelated placebo topic. The treatment spans three months, with six phone calls placed on a biweekly schedule. During each call, a well-trained enumerator following a carefully designed script discusses gender norms with the male respondent, who is asked to commit to small weekly tasks designed to encourage increased male participation in household chores and child care. For the control group, an enumerator places calls at the same frequency but instead discusses a placebo topic – the man’s food consumption in the last 24 hours. We collect endline data from the female spouses of these male household heads two weeks following the final reinforcement phone call. We ask the female respondent detailed information about participation by each household member, including the male spouse, household chores and child care.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
The “Her Time” research project in which this study is nested collects data from 60 VESAs in 8 waves over the course of a year, randomly assigning VESAs to waves. In each VESA, data collection activities consist of an in-person baseline questionnaire followed by 7-12 days of phone surveys and in-person validation interviews, according to their treatment assignment in the “Her Time” study. The project also conducts gender norms information intervention, in which male partners of the women will be treated with information about acceptability of men performing chores that are traditionally allocated to women. The gender norms information experiment is conducted just after the baseline, its treatment is assigned orthogonally to the treatment assignment of the time use study and collects an endline data through the 7-12 days of phone surveys and in-person validation interviews. On completion of these activities, households are randomly assigned to a treatment or control group for this reinforcement study, with treatment stratified by treatment assignment of the gender norms information experiment and age of the male partner collected on the baseline. By making sure that no consecutive individuals are assigned to the treatment when respondents are sorted by age, we make the treatment and control groups balanced in terms of age.
Randomization Unit
Randomization is at the individual level except for survey wave, which is at the VESA level.
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
60 clusters.
Sample size: planned number of observations
900 households
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
450 women's male partners are assigned to treatment, and 450 are assigned to the control group.
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
We are aiming for a Minimum Detectable Effect Size of a quarter of the standard deviation of each outcome variable described.
Supporting Documents and Materials

There are documents in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
University of Georgia
IRB Approval Date
2019-06-19
IRB Approval Number
N/A
Analysis Plan

There are documents in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information