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The impact of political and coronavirus framings on attitudes to aid
Last registered on March 31, 2021

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
The impact of political and coronavirus framings on attitudes to aid
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0007443
Initial registration date
March 30, 2021
Last updated
March 31, 2021 10:44 AM EDT
Location(s)
Region
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
The Australian National University
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
The Australian National University
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2021-04-07
End date
2022-03-11
Secondary IDs
Abstract
This survey experiment will study the impact on public opinion of describing Australia’s foreign aid response using two different frames. The frames used will be: a political frame in which recent increases in foreign aid are expressly tied to the current (conservative) government; and a coronavirus frame in which recent increases in foreign aid will be expressly tied to the use the aid is being put – helping counter the impacts of Covid-19 in developing countries.

The impact will be measured in terms of views on Australian aid volumes.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Edwards, Ryan and Terence Wood. 2021. "The impact of political and coronavirus framings on attitudes to aid." AEA RCT Registry. March 31. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.7443-1.0.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
In addition to the control group, three types of ‘information interventions’ will be provided in the survey experiment.

(T1) A ‘placebo’ group that will receive a factually-accurate vignette about recent increases in Australian foreign aid. This placebo treatment will only contain information on the increases and no information will be provided on why they have occurred.

(T2) A ‘political’ group that will receive a factually-accurate vignette about recent increases in Australian foreign aid. Information on the increases will be almost identical to that provided to the placebo group. However, in the ‘political’ treatment the increases will be clearly linked to the current conservative government. This will be done through the use of party names and the repeated use of the name of the current prime minister. No information on Covid-19 will be included in this treatment.

(T3) A ‘coronavirus’ group that will receive a factually-accurate vignette about recent increases in Australian foreign aid. Information on the increases will be almost identical to that provided to the placebo group. However, in the ‘coronavirus’ treatment the increases will be clearly linked to their focus on combatting Covid-19 in developing countries. No political information or information on political parties will be included in this treatment.
Intervention Start Date
2021-04-14
Intervention End Date
2021-05-12
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
There are two main outcomes of interest. These are:
1) Whether respondents believe that Australian gives too much or too little foreign aid.
2) Whether views on aid volumes differs between left leaning and conservative voters.
Responses to the first outcome of interest are measured on a 5-point scale.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
The effects of these treatments will be evaluated via an online survey of a nationally representative (on sociodemographic traits) sample of the Australian population.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomisation was conducted using the survey firm’s software. Randomization will take place within 18 strata based on gender, age, and political orientation.
Randomization Unit
Individual
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
N/A
Sample size: planned number of observations
3000
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
750
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
Power calculations have been conducted to estimate the sample size required based upon the average effect size and treatment group size of similar studies on this topic (e.g. Hoy & Wood (2018)). The minimum detectable effect size on the primary question of interest (desire for level of aid spending to be changed) is around 7 percentage points (with power 0.8 and alpha 0.05) with a sample size of 750 individuals per group.
Supporting Documents and Materials
Documents
Document Name
Full registration document
Document Type
proposal
Document Description
Details of registration.
File
Full registration document

MD5: fc80ca777e93ff06c17ffb633a006459

SHA1: ec66a35516b91af7a9bf4ee9fa7d358f90f6528a

Uploaded At: March 30, 2021

IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
IRB Approval Date
IRB Approval Number