Patient Perceptions on Physician Education and Quality by Race
Last registered on June 03, 2021

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Patient Perceptions on Physician Education and Quality by Race
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0007745
Initial registration date
June 03, 2021
Last updated
June 03, 2021 5:30 PM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
Harvard Kennedy School
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2021-06-07
End date
2021-12-17
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Research has documented positive effects of doctor-patient race concordance, suggesting that increasing diversity among healthcare professionals may play an important role in addressing well-documented racial health disparities in the US. It also remains critical to improve the quality of interactions in race discordant doctor-patient relationships. However, as we consider policies to increase the number of minority healthcare professionals, especially among doctors, questions about the equilibrium effects of such initiatives naturally emerge. In this project, we examine whether and how patients vary their perceptions of healthcare professionals by race. Significant variation in the perceived quality of minority healthcare professionals could adversely affect the quality and effectiveness of healthcare interactions involving these professionals. Moreover, the range of potential negative patient attitudes that could be encountered in day-to-day clinical practice may also be considered an anticipatory tax and another barrier for prospective minority trainees.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Alsan, Marcella and Ayotomiwa Ojo. 2021. "Patient Perceptions on Physician Education and Quality by Race." AEA RCT Registry. June 03. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.7745-1.0.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
We plan to recruit subjects and randomly assign them to one of four treatments. In each treatment arm, the subject will view a photo of a man. We experimentally vary treatment along two dimensions: whether the man is wearing expert vs. layperson attire and whether the man is white vs. Black. Our outcomes of interest are subjects’ beliefs about educational attainment and perceived quality as measured by subjects’ willingness to accept medical advice for non-urgent health issues or participate in a clinical trial being led by the individual in the photo.
Intervention Start Date
2021-06-07
Intervention End Date
2021-12-17
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Our outcomes of interest are subjects’ beliefs about educational attainment, perceived occupation of the man in the photo, and perceived quality as measured by subjects’ willingness to accept medical advice for non-urgent health issues or participate in a clinical trial being led by the individual in the photo.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
The secondary outcomes are respondents' willingness to wait for their preferred patient-provider and the respondents' perceived attractiveness of the man in the photo.
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
We will have 4 treatment bins. There will be an equal proportion of individuals randomized to each treatment bin. In each treatment bin, the subject will view a photo of a man. We experimentally vary treatment along two dimensions: whether the man is wearing expert vs. layperson attire and whether the man is white vs. black.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomization will be done by Qualtircs software.
Randomization Unit
individual
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
1500 individuals
Sample size: planned number of observations
1500 individuals
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
375 individuals in each treatment bin
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
Calculated sample size to have 80% power to detect an interaction parameter (≈-.4), based on a simulation of 1000 repetitions: N = 1500
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
Harvard University
IRB Approval Date
2021-05-13
IRB Approval Number
IRB21-0682