Competition and Trust

Last registered on November 29, 2021

Pre-Trial

Trial Information

General Information

Title
Competition and Trust
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0008621
Initial registration date
November 24, 2021

Initial registration date is when the trial was registered.

It corresponds to when the registration was submitted to the Registry to be reviewed for publication.

First published
November 29, 2021, 8:24 AM EST

First published corresponds to when the trial was first made public on the Registry after being reviewed.

Locations

Primary Investigator

Affiliation
UBC

Other Primary Investigator(s)

PI Affiliation
Aix Marseille University
PI Affiliation
University of Namur

Additional Trial Information

Status
In development
Start date
2021-11-25
End date
2022-01-31
Secondary IDs
Prior work
This trial does not extend or rely on any prior RCTs.
Abstract
We test the impact of intra-group competition on reported trust in a laboratory setting. We use standard measures of trust, incentivised games and survey questions to measure trust. We place individuals into randomly selected public goods games teams where rewards are shared equally. Rewards depend on one's group contributing more to the public goods game than a randomly assigned competitor group. We vary the degree to which teams are disadvantaged/advantaged in this competition. There are 5 treatments -- groups that are 10% advantaged, meaning they will be recorded as the winner if they are either above or up to 10% below the competitor team, groups that are 50% advantaged, groups that are 10% disadvantaged, groups that are 50% disadvantaged, and groups that are equal, 0% advantage. After playing the PGG game they will then be measured on the trust dimension again. This experiment is a continuation of research on the relationship between pro-social behavior and competition. In a paper published in Science Advances (2018) we showed that individuals employed in more competitive sectors are also individuals who respond positively to the generalized trust question. We found that individuals placed in more competitive PGG settings also responded more positive to the generalised trust question. All of those were in settings where the playing field was level, i.e., the 0% treatment above. Here we are seeing whether non-level playing field affects those results. We conjecture that the positive effect of enhanced competition could be mitigated by being disadvantaged. We are unsure what effect this will have on the advantaged groups.
External Link(s)

Registration Citation

Citation
Francois, Patrick, Marc Sangnier and Tanguy van Ypersele. 2021. "Competition and Trust." AEA RCT Registry. November 29. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.8621
Experimental Details

Interventions

Intervention(s)
Intervention Start Date
2021-11-25
Intervention End Date
2022-01-31

Primary Outcomes

Primary Outcomes (end points)
trust question responses
Primary Outcomes (explanation)

Secondary Outcomes

Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)

Experimental Design

Experimental Design
We test the impact of intra-group competition on reported trust in a laboratory setting. We use standard measures of trust, incentivised games and survey questions to measure trust. We place individuals into randomly selected public goods games teams where rewards are shared equally. Rewards depend on one's group contributing more to the public goods game than a randomly assigned competitor group. We vary the degree to which teams are disadvantaged/advantaged in this competition. There are 5 treatments -- groups that are 10% advantaged, meaning they will be recorded as the winner if they are either above or up to 10% below the competitor team, groups that are 50% advantaged, groups that are 10% disadvantaged, groups that are 50% disadvantaged, and groups that are equal, 0% advantage. After playing the PGG game they will then be measured on the trust dimension again. This experiment is a continuation of research on the relationship between pro-social behavior and competition. In a paper published in Science Advances (2018) we showed that individuals employed in more competitive sectors are also individuals who respond positively to the generalized trust question.
Experimental Design Details
Randomization Method
Randomization done by a computer and administered by lab manager (not researchers)
Randomization Unit
1. Individuals to place into two person groups
2. Groups are randomised into competitive treatments (e.g. some have 10% advantage, some 10% disadvantage etc.)
Was the treatment clustered?
No

Experiment Characteristics

Sample size: planned number of clusters
No clusters
Sample size: planned number of observations
600
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
100 for 5 treatments
100 for control
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs)

IRB Name
Comité d’éthique de l’université d’Aix-Marseille (Aix Marseille University Ethical Review Board)
IRB Approval Date
2021-07-09
IRB Approval Number
2021-07-08-05

Post-Trial

Post Trial Information

Study Withdrawal

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Intervention

Is the intervention completed?
No
Data Collection Complete
Data Publication

Data Publication

Is public data available?
No

Program Files

Program Files
Reports, Papers & Other Materials

Relevant Paper(s)

Reports & Other Materials