x

Please fill out this short user survey of only 3 questions in order to help us improve the site. We appreciate your feedback!
Back to History Current Version
Sharing Responsibility for the Good
Last registered on February 26, 2018

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Sharing Responsibility for the Good
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0002751
Initial registration date
February 26, 2018
Last updated
February 26, 2018 1:44 PM EST
Location(s)
Region
Region
Primary Investigator
Affiliation
Maastricht University
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
TU Clausthal
Additional Trial Information
Status
In development
Start date
2018-03-12
End date
2018-03-16
Secondary IDs
Abstract
A series of recent studies has found converging evidence for the following effect. Experimental subjects are willing to engage in economic transactions that impose costs on uninvolved third parties at lower levels of personal monetary benefits when these decisions are made by pairs or larger groups of subjects as compared to when subjects make the same decisions individually (see, e.g.: Falk & Szech 2013, Science; Irlenbusch & Saxler, 2015, IZA Disc. Paper 9240; Bartling et al. 2015, QJE). Our experiment investigates whether an analogous effect can also be observed for economic transactions that have positive effects on uninvolved third parties.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Greiff, Matthias and Hannes Rusch. 2018. "Sharing Responsibility for the Good." AEA RCT Registry. February 26. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.2751-1.0.
Former Citation
Greiff, Matthias, Hannes Rusch and Hannes Rusch. 2018. "Sharing Responsibility for the Good." AEA RCT Registry. February 26. http://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/2751/history/26100.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
We will recruit participants through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk platform (mturk.com). They will complete an online survey that collects all independent as well as the dependent measures, i.e. participants’ decisions in two experimental conditions (between-subjects design). The full survey as well as a full description of the rationale of this study are attached to this preregistration as a PDF. They will be made public upon completion of data collection.
Intervention Start Date
2018-03-12
Intervention End Date
2018-03-16
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Dependent variable: We will measure participants’ willingness to pay (WTP, in US-$) for a complete measles vaccination of one child (administered through UNICEF) in two experimental conditions: ‘individual decision making’ and ‘bilateral decision making’.

Independent variables: treatment (individual vs. bilateral decisions), belief about partner's WTP, demographics, participants’ responses to the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ30) and to two trolley scenarios (‘Switch’ and ‘Footbridge’, see, e.g.: Rusch 2015, Rationality, Markets & Morals) as well as several explorative self-report items.
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
We will recruit participants through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk platform (mturk.com). They will complete an online survey that collects all independent as well as the dependent measures, i.e. participants’ decisions in two experimental conditions (between-subjects design). The full survey as well as a full description of the rationale of this study are attached to this preregistration as a PDF. They will be made public upon completion of data collection.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
As implemented in the software used to collect survey data (Qualtrics).
Randomization Unit
Individual
Was the treatment clustered?
Yes
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
We will use the TurkPrime service to recruit participants on MTurk, resulting in groups of 9 participants answering the survey at roughly the same time. However, since we will use within-cluster randomization of participants into treatments, we do not expect this recruitment procedure to have any effect on the results.
Sample size: planned number of observations
360 adults
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
120 per group (groups: active individual, active bilateral, passive individual)
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
Using a non-parametric two-tailed Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test for a difference in the WTPs between our two treatment groups (group size: 120 each), our design allows us to detect effects of d = 0.37 at a 5% significance level and a power of 0.8.
Supporting Documents and Materials

There are documents in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
German Association for Experimental Economic Research e.V.
IRB Approval Date
2018-02-13
IRB Approval Number
GYVSPcCU
Analysis Plan

There are documents in this trial unavailable to the public. Use the button below to request access to this information.

Request Information