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Stimulating Fruit and Vegetable Intakes in Urban Ethiopia
Last registered on January 25, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Stimulating Fruit and Vegetable Intakes in Urban Ethiopia
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0003783
Initial registration date
January 22, 2019
Last updated
January 25, 2019 3:54 AM EST
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
International Food Policy Research Institute
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
IFPRI
PI Affiliation
International Food Policy Research Institute
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2016-11-30
End date
2019-10-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
Inadequate consumption of fruits and vegetables is now recognized as an important risk factor for non-communicable diseases. Ethiopia is one among the developing countries with the lowest intakes of fruits and vegetables. In Ethiopia, cereals and pulse largely dominate the food consumption baskets, while the consumption of animal-source foods and fruits and vegetables is rare. There are several factors that can potentially influence the consumption of fruits and vegetables in developing counties such as Ethiopia, including household income, price, access or availability, what consumers choose to purchase and consume, and consumer knowledge about the nutrition and health benefits of fruits and vegetables. This pilot experiment aims to address the knowledge gaps on the nutrition and health benefits of fruits and vegetables and thereby attempt to find ways to increase their consumption frequency and amount at the household level.

In order to attain the above-mentioned objective—increasing the intake of fruits and vegetables —the experiment will implement a video-based behavioral change communication targeting a sample of households in Addis Ababa. The intervention will have two treatment arms besides the comparison group. Households in the first treatment arm will be trained on the recommended behaviors regarding the consumption of fruits and vegetables like the one by WHO—i.e. at least two servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables per day. While this intervention mimics the current practice carried out by the public health extension workers in the country, it will be aided by a video medium that features local characters. Households in the second treatment arm will be trained about the established processes or mechanisms by which the consumption of fruits and vegetables can lead to a better nutrition and health outcomes, in addition to the recommended behaviors. This treatment is intended to address the why aspect in recommended behaviors, often overlooked in standard behavioral change communication approaches.

External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Abate, Gashaw, Alan de Brauw and Kalle Hirvonen. 2019. "Stimulating Fruit and Vegetable Intakes in Urban Ethiopia." AEA RCT Registry. January 25. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.3783-1.0
Former Citation
Abate, Gashaw et al. 2019. "Stimulating Fruit and Vegetable Intakes in Urban Ethiopia." AEA RCT Registry. January 25. https://www.socialscienceregistry.org/trials/3783/history/40631
Sponsors & Partners

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Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
The experiment will implement a video-based behavioral change communication targeting a sample of households in Addis Ababa. The intervention will have two treatment arms and a comparison group. Households in the first treatment arm will be trained on the recommended behaviors regarding the consumption of fruits and vegetables like the one by WHO—i.e. at least two servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables per day. While this intervention mimics the current practice carried out by the public health extension workers in the country, it will be aided by a video medium that features local characters. Households in the second treatment arm will be trained about the established processes or mechanisms by which the consumption of fruits and vegetables can lead to a better nutrition and health outcomes, in addition to the recommended behaviors. This treatment is intended to address the why aspect in recommended behaviors, often overlooked in standard behavioral change communication approaches.
Intervention Start Date
2019-03-01
Intervention End Date
2019-05-01
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
nutrition knowledge and household consumption of fruits and vegetables are our key outcomes of interest
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
A main finding from our preliminary work is that nutritional knowledge is weak among consumers in Addis Ababa, which may be a compelling reason that diets are poor. As a result, we are focusing on improvements in nutritional knowledge as a primary outcome that we believe is attainable through the interventions at hand. The same preliminary work has suggested that fruit and vegetable consumption are really low relative to international dietary recommendations, so we will measure their consumption at endline (they were not measured at baseline).
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
Our experimental design is to compare the two treatments described in earlier sections against a control group. As the video intervention can be shows to individuals on tablets, we will use individual level randomization stratified at the neighborhood level.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomization will be done in an office using a computer (in Addis).
Randomization Unit
The randomization unit are individuals; we will have health agents
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
40 neighborhoods within Addis Ababa
Sample size: planned number of observations
close to 1000 observations
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
1/3 in each of two treatments; 1/3 in the control group
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
We have completed power calculations for the nutritional knowledge variables, which will be transformed into a normalized score based on the baseline data that have been collected. With 332 households per arm we can detect an 0.22 SD increase in nutrition knowledge score without controlling for additional covariates.
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
International Food Policy Research Institute
IRB Approval Date
2019-01-22
IRB Approval Number
N/A