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Learning to see the world’s opportunities: The impact of visualisation on entrepreneurial success
Last registered on October 29, 2019

Pre-Trial

Trial Information
General Information
Title
Learning to see the world’s opportunities: The impact of visualisation on entrepreneurial success
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0004695
Initial registration date
October 28, 2019
Last updated
October 29, 2019 9:56 AM EDT
Location(s)

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Primary Investigator
Affiliation
University of Oxford
Other Primary Investigator(s)
PI Affiliation
London School of Economics
PI Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet
PI Affiliation
World Bank
PI Affiliation
London School of Economics
PI Affiliation
London School of Economics
Additional Trial Information
Status
On going
Start date
2019-06-04
End date
2021-12-31
Secondary IDs
Abstract
We study whether visualisation can be used to access information more efficiently and improve decision making. We test our primary hypotheses that visualisation improves performance in economic choices and can be taught through a randomised control trial with 1967 aspiring entrepreneurs in Colombia. Half our sample receive a ten-session training programme designed to use visualisation in business decision making. To control for the informational content of the programme, the other half of our sample receive either business-as-usual training or assigned to a pure control group. We expect treated individuals to be more likely to use visualisation and with higher quality, resulting in higher performance in choice experiments and better outcomes on average. Furthermore, our sample is characterised as “vulnerable”, with approximately 30% reporting that they have been exposed to armed conflict or migration from the Venezuelan crisis. Consistent with recent findings in neuroscience and psychology that past traumatic experiences make it particularly costly to visualise, we expect individuals previously exposed to trauma to benefit most from the training.
External Link(s)
Registration Citation
Citation
Ashraf, Nava et al. 2019. "Learning to see the world’s opportunities: The impact of visualisation on entrepreneurial success." AEA RCT Registry. October 29. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.4695-1.0.
Experimental Details
Interventions
Intervention(s)
We have designed a ten-session entrepreneurship training programme that uses visualisation techniques to improve business decision making.
Intervention Start Date
2019-07-15
Intervention End Date
2019-12-06
Primary Outcomes
Primary Outcomes (end points)
Income and wellbeing
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
Secondary Outcomes
Secondary Outcomes (end points)
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)
Experimental Design
Experimental Design
We will test our primary hypotheses that visualisation improves performance in economic choices and can be taught through a randomised control trial in Bogotá, Colombia. 3553 individuals applied to attend our ten-session entrepreneurship training programme. Of those eligible, 1967 individuals with entrepreneurship potential were randomised into one of three groups. Half our sample were invited to participate in a ten-session entrepreneurship training overlaid with visualisation techniques. To control for the informational content of the training, a quarter received the same training without the visualisation exercises (essentially, a placebo group). The remaining quarter were assigned to our pure control group. Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) Colombia collected baseline data on all individuals at their homes or preferred locations prior to the training. Our first and second follow-up surveys will be conducted four and twelve months respectively after the end of the intervention in 2020.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
Randomisation was carried out in an office with a computer using STATA, and we stratified randomisation by gender, age, entrepreneurship status, and income/sales.
Randomization Unit
Individual
Was the treatment clustered?
No
Experiment Characteristics
Sample size: planned number of clusters
1967 individuals
Sample size: planned number of observations
1967 individuals
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
956 individuals in treatment; 558 individuals in placebo control; 453 in pure control
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB
INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS (IRBs)
IRB Name
London School of Economics Research Ethics Committee
IRB Approval Date
2019-06-24
IRB Approval Number
00769C
IRB Name
Innovations for Poverty Action IRB-USA
IRB Approval Date
2019-06-18
IRB Approval Number
14638