Perceived Child Costs and Fertility Plans: Evidence from Two Incentivized Survey Experiments

Last registered on September 07, 2022

Pre-Trial

Trial Information

General Information

Title
Perceived Child Costs and Fertility Plans: Evidence from Two Incentivized Survey Experiments
RCT ID
AEARCTR-0009987
Initial registration date
September 02, 2022

Initial registration date is when the trial was registered.

It corresponds to when the registration was submitted to the Registry to be reviewed for publication.

First published
September 07, 2022, 3:39 PM EDT

First published corresponds to when the trial was first made public on the Registry after being reviewed.

Locations

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Primary Investigator

Affiliation
RIEM,Southwestern University of Finance and Economics

Other Primary Investigator(s)

PI Affiliation
UCL
PI Affiliation
Zhongnan University of Economics and Law
PI Affiliation
RIEM,Southwestern University of Finance and Economics

Additional Trial Information

Status
On going
Start date
2022-05-10
End date
2023-01-01
Secondary IDs
Prior work
This trial does not extend or rely on any prior RCTs.
Abstract
Global fertility rate has been decreasing for decades but the world is not well-prepared for this challenge. Are the raising perceived cost of childrearing discouraging the fertility? How do people’s fertility plans response to potential fertility subsidies? In two separate large field survey experiments in China, we answer both questions and propose potential intervention on boosting fertility in developing countries. The first experiment documents people’s perceived cost and benefit of childrearing, fertility plan and optimal number of children. In study 1, we randomize the information provisions of the actual cost of child-rearing among the average population in the province and the benefit of additional child. In study 1, we can answer whether treated people can update their perceived cost of childrearing. And whether information change their fertility planning. In study 2, we randomize the amount of fertility subsidies, under the incentive that their decision will affect the design of the subsidies. We can find how people’s fertility planning responses to the change of fertility subsidies.
External Link(s)

Registration Citation

Citation
Carneiro, Pedro et al. 2022. "Perceived Child Costs and Fertility Plans: Evidence from Two Incentivized Survey Experiments." AEA RCT Registry. September 07. https://doi.org/10.1257/rct.9987-1.0
Experimental Details

Interventions

Intervention(s)
In study 1, the essential informations are about the child costs and benefits. Participants randomly assigned to the treatment groups 1 and 2 received the information on costs about child-rearing. Participants assigned to group 3 and 4 received the information on the benefit about having more children. in study 2, we randomly assign participants into 11 treatment arms which will give information on different amounts of fertility subsidies.
Intervention Start Date
2022-05-10
Intervention End Date
2022-05-13

Primary Outcomes

Primary Outcomes (end points)
Perceived costs about children. Fertility planning
Primary Outcomes (explanation)
1. Perceived costs about children measures the costs will occur if an individual have the first/second/third child (money spend during child's age 0-17)
2. Planned number of children measures the number of children an individual plans to have in the life,
3. Optimal number of children measures the number of children an individual likes to have if there is no budget constraint

Secondary Outcomes

Secondary Outcomes (end points)
money and time investment in children
Secondary Outcomes (explanation)

Experimental Design

Experimental Design
we incorporate the randomization mechanism into the survey, stratified randomization.
Experimental Design Details
Not available
Randomization Method
computer randomization
Randomization Unit
individual level
Was the treatment clustered?
No

Experiment Characteristics

Sample size: planned number of clusters
in study 1, 30000 adults
in study 2, 5000 adults
Sample size: planned number of observations
in study 1, 30000 adults in study 2, 5000 adults
Sample size (or number of clusters) by treatment arms
in study 1, 30000 adults
in study 2, 5000 adults
Minimum detectable effect size for main outcomes (accounting for sample design and clustering)
IRB

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs)

IRB Name
China Center for Behavioral Economics and Finance Research Ethics Committee (CCBEF-REC)
IRB Approval Date
2022-05-05
IRB Approval Number
2022_002